My Place extract   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1990 1990
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Aboriginal Voices : Contemporary Aboriginal Artists, Writers and Performers Liz Thompson , Brookvale : Simon and Schuster Australia , 1990 Z822418 1990 anthology autobiography essay extract poetry

    Brief autobiographical statements by well-known black Australian writers, transcribed and edited from interviews. Also includes short extracts from their literary works.

    Brookvale : Simon and Schuster Australia , 1990
    pg. 40-41

Works about this Work

White Closets, Jangling Nerves and the Biopolitics of the Public Secret Fiona Probyn , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 57-75)
'This essay attempts to outline the relationship between the 'raw nerves' that Denis Byrne describes in the epigraph above, and the cultivation of 'indifference' that Stanner identifies as being characteristic of 'European life' in Australia. Here I situate indifference as numbing the 'jangling' of 'raw nerves' and as cultivated, disseminated and feeding specific forms of public secrecy. How did the white men who enforces segregation by day and pursued Aboriginal women by night manage their 'jangling nerves, if indeed they did jangle? How did they manage to be seen and known and have their secrets kept for them, as much as by them. How did this contradiction of segregation and sexual intimacy, if indeed it is a contradiction, work, My hope is that if we can understand how the white men (and those around them), regulated these jangling nerves, then we might be able to understand the relationship between indifference, public secrecy and the biopolitical forms that Australian whiteness took in the twentieth century, and specifically in the period of assimilation, extending from the 1930s to, roughly, the end of the 1960s.' (Author's introduction p. 57)
Black and White : In Search of an ‘Apt’ Response to Indigenous Writing Robin Freeman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'The good editor,' suggests Thomas McCormack in his Fiction Editor, the Novel and the Novelist, 'reads, and ... responds aptly' to the writer's work, 'where "aptly" means "as the ideal appropriate reader would".' McCormack develops an argument that encompasses the dual ideas of sensibility and craft as essential characteristics of the fiction editor. But at an historical juncture that has seen increasing interest in the publication of Indigenous writing, and when Indigenous writers themselves may envisage a multiplicity of readers (writing, for instance, for family and community, and to educate a wider white audience), who is the 'ideal appropriate reader' for the literary works of the current generation of Australian Indigenous writers? And what should the work of this 'good editor' be when engaging with the text of an Indigenous writer? This paper examines such questions using the work of Margaret McDonell and Jennifer Jones, among others, to explore ways in which non-Indigenous editors may apply aspects of McCormack's 'apt response' to the editing of Indigenous texts.' (Author's abstract)
The Trial of Andrew Bolt : II : Real Aborigines Verses Phoneys Keith Windshuttle , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , December vol. 54 no. 12 2010; (p. 20-25)
'The decision by a group of Aboriginal political activists to sue Andrew Bolt in the Federal Court for racial vilification is a surprising one that may backfire in ways they hadn’t expected. The case itself cannot avoid examining closely what constitutes Aboriginal identity. The minute that question is opened for serious discussion there are awkward political issues that follow. In fact, with a constitutional amendment currently being flagged by the Gillard government, this case may provide an opportunity to bring the vexed question of Aboriginal identity out into the open. Moreover, depending on the outcome of the case, it could provide a green light for the emergence of many more claimants who other Aborigines regard as completely phoney.' (p. 20)
'Blackfella Loving' Ronald M. Berndt , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Messengers of Eros : Representations of Sex in Australian Writing 2009; (p. 317-340)
Categorical Infringement : Australian Prose in the Eighties Carolyn Bliss , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Narrative Technique , Winter vol. 21 no. 1 1991; (p. 43-51)
Out of the West Jeremy Eccles , 1991 single work column
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Review , May vol. 6 no. 5 1991; (p. 14-15)
Turning Full Circle Lindy Brophy , 1991 single work column
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Review , August vol. 6 no. 8 1991; (p. 12-13)
Categorical Infringement : Australian Prose in the Eighties Carolyn Bliss , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Narrative Technique , Winter vol. 21 no. 1 1991; (p. 43-51)
Out of the West Jeremy Eccles , 1991 single work column
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Review , May vol. 6 no. 5 1991; (p. 14-15)
Turning Full Circle Lindy Brophy , 1991 single work column
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Review , August vol. 6 no. 8 1991; (p. 12-13)
'Blackfella Loving' Ronald M. Berndt , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Messengers of Eros : Representations of Sex in Australian Writing 2009; (p. 317-340)
Black and White : In Search of an ‘Apt’ Response to Indigenous Writing Robin Freeman , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'The good editor,' suggests Thomas McCormack in his Fiction Editor, the Novel and the Novelist, 'reads, and ... responds aptly' to the writer's work, 'where "aptly" means "as the ideal appropriate reader would".' McCormack develops an argument that encompasses the dual ideas of sensibility and craft as essential characteristics of the fiction editor. But at an historical juncture that has seen increasing interest in the publication of Indigenous writing, and when Indigenous writers themselves may envisage a multiplicity of readers (writing, for instance, for family and community, and to educate a wider white audience), who is the 'ideal appropriate reader' for the literary works of the current generation of Australian Indigenous writers? And what should the work of this 'good editor' be when engaging with the text of an Indigenous writer? This paper examines such questions using the work of Margaret McDonell and Jennifer Jones, among others, to explore ways in which non-Indigenous editors may apply aspects of McCormack's 'apt response' to the editing of Indigenous texts.' (Author's abstract)
The Trial of Andrew Bolt : II : Real Aborigines Verses Phoneys Keith Windshuttle , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , December vol. 54 no. 12 2010; (p. 20-25)
'The decision by a group of Aboriginal political activists to sue Andrew Bolt in the Federal Court for racial vilification is a surprising one that may backfire in ways they hadn’t expected. The case itself cannot avoid examining closely what constitutes Aboriginal identity. The minute that question is opened for serious discussion there are awkward political issues that follow. In fact, with a constitutional amendment currently being flagged by the Gillard government, this case may provide an opportunity to bring the vexed question of Aboriginal identity out into the open. Moreover, depending on the outcome of the case, it could provide a green light for the emergence of many more claimants who other Aborigines regard as completely phoney.' (p. 20)
White Closets, Jangling Nerves and the Biopolitics of the Public Secret Fiona Probyn , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 57-75)
'This essay attempts to outline the relationship between the 'raw nerves' that Denis Byrne describes in the epigraph above, and the cultivation of 'indifference' that Stanner identifies as being characteristic of 'European life' in Australia. Here I situate indifference as numbing the 'jangling' of 'raw nerves' and as cultivated, disseminated and feeding specific forms of public secrecy. How did the white men who enforces segregation by day and pursued Aboriginal women by night manage their 'jangling nerves, if indeed they did jangle? How did they manage to be seen and known and have their secrets kept for them, as much as by them. How did this contradiction of segregation and sexual intimacy, if indeed it is a contradiction, work, My hope is that if we can understand how the white men (and those around them), regulated these jangling nerves, then we might be able to understand the relationship between indifference, public secrecy and the biopolitical forms that Australian whiteness took in the twentieth century, and specifically in the period of assimilation, extending from the 1930s to, roughly, the end of the 1960s.' (Author's introduction p. 57)
Last amended 31 Aug 2009 13:58:46
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