Narroondarie's Wives single work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 1924 1924
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Narroondarie is the name of one of the many good men that were sent among the various tribes of the Australian Aborigines...' (David Unaipon, 1924-25)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Legendary Tales of the Australian Aborigines David Unaipon , 1924-1925 6043804 1924 single work prose Indigenous story

    This manuscript contains the original works of David Unaipon's Legendary Tales of the Australian Aborigines.

    1924-1925
    Note: This loose leaf sections is numbered 16:1-22.
  • Appears in:
    y Myths and Legends of the Australian Aborigines Myths & Legends of the Australian Aboriginals Alice Bolingbroke Woodward (illustrator), W. Ramsay Smith , David Unaipon , London : Harrap , 1930 6080162 1930 selected work prose dreaming story

    This 1930s publication describes the legends of the Australian Aborigines located in the southeast corner of Australia near the Murray River. It covers a range of narratives from the creation stories to those of witchcraft, and explanations of landmarks. (Source: Preface).

    London : Harrap , 1930
    pg. 317-331
    Note: With title: Nurunderi's Wives
  • Appears in:
    y Paperbark : A Collection of Black Australian Writings Jack Davis (editor), Stephen Muecke (editor), Mudrooroo (editor), Adam Shoemaker (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1990 Z299632 1990 anthology poetry drama short story criticism prose autobiography biography (taught in 2 units)

    'This is the first collection to span the diverse range of Black Australian writings. Thirty-six Aboriginal and Islander authors have contributed, including David Unaipon, Oodgeroo Noonuccal, Gerry Bostock, Ruby Langford, Robert Bropho, Jack Davis, Hyllus Maris, William Ferguson, Sally Morgan, Mudrooroo Narogin and Archie Weller. Many more are represented through community writings such as petitions and letters.

    Collected over six years from all the states and territories of Australia, Paperbark ranges widely across time and genre from the 1840s to the present, from transcriptions of oral literature to rock opera. Prose, poetry, song, drama and polemic are accompanied by the selected artworks of Jimmy Pike, and an extensive, up-to-date bibliography.The voices of Black Australia speak with passion and power in this challenging and important anthology.' Source: Publisher's blurb.

    St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1990
    pg. 19-32
  • Appears in:
    y Legendary Tales of the Australian Aborigines David Unaipon , Z900600 2001 selected work prose dreaming story (taught in 1 units) Melbourne : Melbourne University Press , 2001 pg. 120-133

Works about this Work

The Tree and Its Voices : What the Casuarina Says Barbara Holloway , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , Summer vol. 1 no. 2011;
'The tree known popularly and scientifically as the casuarina has been consistently noticed for the sounds made as wind passes through its unusual foliage of needles and leaf scales. The acoustic experience of the casuarina — with subspecies found throughout Australia — has been represented as 'haunted', 'grieving' and voicing the secret language of initiates. This essay traces intriguing conceptual and aesthetic representations of the 'voice' and its listeners found across both Aboriginal and white Australian cultures in traditional English verse, Aboriginal prose narrative, accounts of cultural practices, and hybrid blends of all three. The essay adopts the notion of 'listening to listening' to set out the many forms of story the tree's sounds generate their contribution to identifying places, and to suggest a specific Aboriginal song-line appears to underlie the divergent replications of tree-'voice' across southern Australia.' (Author's abstract)
Appropriation or Post-Colonial Renaissance Stephen Muecke , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Textual Spaces : Aboriginality and Cultural Studies 1992; (p. 163-178)
'In this chapter I am going to advance the thesis that spatial movements, including landscape, everyday 'city spaces', writing and travel, are all closely interrelated, and that the extraordinary mobility of recent creative work by Aboriginal artists constitutes a strong movement towards post-colonisation as it carries a series of implications for the practice of perceiving the land.' (164)
The Tree and Its Voices : What the Casuarina Says Barbara Holloway , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , Summer vol. 1 no. 2011;
'The tree known popularly and scientifically as the casuarina has been consistently noticed for the sounds made as wind passes through its unusual foliage of needles and leaf scales. The acoustic experience of the casuarina — with subspecies found throughout Australia — has been represented as 'haunted', 'grieving' and voicing the secret language of initiates. This essay traces intriguing conceptual and aesthetic representations of the 'voice' and its listeners found across both Aboriginal and white Australian cultures in traditional English verse, Aboriginal prose narrative, accounts of cultural practices, and hybrid blends of all three. The essay adopts the notion of 'listening to listening' to set out the many forms of story the tree's sounds generate their contribution to identifying places, and to suggest a specific Aboriginal song-line appears to underlie the divergent replications of tree-'voice' across southern Australia.' (Author's abstract)
Appropriation or Post-Colonial Renaissance Stephen Muecke , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Textual Spaces : Aboriginality and Cultural Studies 1992; (p. 163-178)
'In this chapter I am going to advance the thesis that spatial movements, including landscape, everyday 'city spaces', writing and travel, are all closely interrelated, and that the extraordinary mobility of recent creative work by Aboriginal artists constitutes a strong movement towards post-colonisation as it carries a series of implications for the practice of perceiving the land.' (164)
Last amended 18 Jun 2013 13:00:02
Subjects:
  • Coast,
  • Kangaroo Island, South Australia,
Settings:
  • Murray River,
  • South Australia,
  • Lake Albert, Wagga Wagga, Wagga Wagga area, Riverina - Murray area, New South Wales,
  • Encounter Bay, Victor Harbor - Goolwa area, Fleurieu Peninsula - Lake Alexandrina, South Australia,
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