5611088238081421929.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y The Great Australian Loneliness single work   autobiography   travel  
Alternative title: Ports of Sunset; Australian Frontier
Issue Details: First known date: 1937 1937
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

An account of the author's five years of travel through the outback, from Adelaide to Darwin on the Birdsville Track, to the Red Centre and Arnhem Land.

Notes

  • Also available in braille, and as a sound recording.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,: Robertson and Mullens , 1946 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Darwini"Man Fong Low and Wing Cheong Sing -", Ernestine Hill , 1930 single work poetry

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Jarrold , 1937 .
      Extent: 334p.
      Description: illus.; map, ports.
      Note/s:
      • UQ copy is signed by the author.
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Doubleday, Doran , 1937 .
      Alternative title: Australian Frontier
      Extent: ix, 332p.p.
      Edition info: US ed.
      Description: illus.; map on lining papers
      Reprinted: 1942
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Robertson and Mullens , 1940 .
      Extent: 346p.
      Edition info: 1st Australian ed.
      Description: illus.; map on lining papers, [20]p. plates.
      Reprinted: 1942 , 1943 , 1945 , 1948 , 1952 , 1954 , 1956
      Note/s:
      • Illustrative details differ between reprints
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Council on Books in Wartime , 1942 .
      Alternative title: Australian Frontier
      Extent: 320p.
      Edition info: Armed services ed.
      Note/s:
      • 'First ed. published: New York : Doubleday, Doran, 1942. U.S. edition of The great Australian Loneliness. Slightly different text.'

        Source: Libraries Australia

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Pacific Books , 1968 .
      Extent: 346p.
      Series: Pacific Books Angus and Robertson (publisher), 1961 series - publisher The establishment of this paperback imprint of Angus Robertson was spearheaded by Beatrice Davis. It started with print runs of 20,000 in 1961 (Paper Empires: History of Book in Australia, 18).This paperback series, published by Angus and Robertson, contains both numbered and unnumbered volumes.
    • Potts Point, Kings Cross area, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: ETT Imprint , 1995 .
      Extent: 346p.
      Edition info: "An Imprint book".
      ISBN: 1875892060
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: ETT Imprint , 2016 .
      5611088238081421929.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 350p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 1 March 2016
      ISBN: 9781925416329

Works about this Work

‘The Great Australian Loneliness’ : On Writing an Inter-Asian Biography of Ernestine Hill Meaghan Morris , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Intercultural Studies , vol. 35 no. 3 2014; (p. 238-249)
'The Great Australian Loneliness (1937) is a famous book of travel reportage by Ernestine Hill (1899–1972), a key figure in the mid-twentieth century shaping of popular media culture in Australia. Through her journalism she disseminated debate about the great public issues of her day: the status of Aboriginal peoples, immigration from Asia and the state’s role in national development. In this paper, I take the White Australian ‘loneliness’ her title invokes as a methodological challenge to situate both her life and the ethnically diverse sociability she actually described in an inter-Asian framework of analysis capable of unsettling those bonds between ethnicity and nationality that many twentieth-century writers worked so hard to secure. In the process, I argue for an ‘Australian Asian’ approach to cultural history.' (Publication abstract)
Ernestine Hill and the North : Reading Race and Indigeneity In the Great Australian Loneliness and The Territory Adam Gall , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , 1 June vol. 37 no. 2 2013; (p. 194-207)
'This article examines the work of Ernestine Hill (1899–1972), an Australian journalist, travel writer, and broadcaster. It begins by elaborating some of the ways in which Hill's life and work have been given scholarly treatment previously, and then it proposes a reading of her work in terms of the themes of race and belonging—in particular, the relationship between whiteness and indigeneity in her written depictions of Australia's far north. The article draws upon the conceptual framework developed by Terry Goldie and Penelope Ingram to read Hill's collection of travel pieces,The Great Australian Loneliness (1937), and her historical writing in The Territory (1951).' (Authors abstract)
American Servicemen Find Ernestine Hill in Their Kitbags : The Great Australian Loneliness Anna Johnston , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 84-90)
The Transnational Fantasy : The Case of James Cowan Peter Matthews , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 67-73)
'Recent criticism has seen the rise of an approach to literature that views texts as products of 'transnationalism,' a move that arises from a growing sense that, in a global age, authors should not be bounded by the traditional limits of national culture. In her book Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism Beyond the Nation (2006), for instance, Rebecca Walkowitz looks at how this trend has evolved in world Anglophone literature, extending from canonical writers like Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf to such contemporary authors as Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and W.G. Sebald. In the field of Australian literature, the question of transnationalism is often linked to issues of postcolonialism, as reflected in recent critical works like Graham Huggan's Australian Literature: Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism (2007) and Nathanael O'Reilly's edited collection Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature (2010), both of which examine how Australian literature and culture have metamorphosed in the new global context. While there is little doubt that world literature has been affected in important ways by this broadening of literary stage, there seems to be a widespread conflation between two similar but different terms: the transnational and transcultural. For while it is true that the culture of many countries arises from a cosmopolitan and diverse assortment of influences, this loosening of cultural boundaries between nations is far from being simultaneous with the decline of the state.' (Author's introduction)
Ask the Leyland Brothers : Instructional TV, Travel and Popular Memory Chris Healy , Alison Huber , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 24 no. 3 2010; (p. 389 - 398)
'This article considers television made by two Australian brothers, Mike and Mal Leyland, specifically their long-running series from the 1970s, Ask the Leyland Brothers. The program used viewer participation to set an itinerary for the brothers, who travelled extensively by car to film responses to viewers' questions about Australia. Mike and Mal Leyland brought images of the Australian countryside to very large television audiences, providing entertainment and instructions about how to travel, appreciate and consume the country they and their audience lived in. While this example of 'instructional TV' was extremely popular in its 10-year run on television, and is fondly remembered by audiences, it is not prominent in the 'official' discourse of Australia's TV history; thus, it poses a particular set of questions about television and cultural memory.' (Author's abstrat)
White Journeys into Black Country Tracy Spencer , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 149-161)
'Rebecca Forbes and Jim Page were English immigrants who lived and died amongst the Adnyamathanha people of the northern Flinders Ranges in the first half of the twentieth century. The first time I saw their two graves there - just the two of them, on their won up the hill, a little above the community at Nepabunna - I asked the obvious question: How did they come to be there? The journeys involved in these trajectories - immigration from England to Australia, migration from the coast to the inland - are the focus of this paper.' (Author's introduction, 149)
Train Spotting : Reconciliation and Long-Distance Rail Travel in Australia Peter Bishop , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 162-174)
Representing Australian Space in The Overlanders Elizabeth Webby , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 115-123)
This paper will examine the influence of Watt's representation of Australian space in The Overlanders on other films made in Australia during the 1950s, including Charles Chauvel's Jedda (1955) and Jack Lee's Robbery Under Arms (1957)...(From author's abstract p. 115)
Metamorphosis : Travel Narratives and Aboriginal/Non-Aboriginal Relations in the 1930s Paul Miller , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 75 2002; (p. 85-92, notes 189-190)
Untitled Tony Maniaty , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1-2 July 1995; (p. rev 9)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Foreword : Bush Jewels Still Sparkle Elizabeth Swanson , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 15-16 June 1991; (p. rev 7)
Panorama : The Live, The Dead and The Living Meaghan Morris , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Island in the Stream : Myths of Place in Australian Culture 1988; (p. 160-187)
Untitled Maggie MacPhee , 1977 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29 January 1977; (p. 19)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
New in Paperback 1969 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 25 January 1969; (p. 15)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Riot of Colour ... in Paperback Parade 1968 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 14 September 1968; (p. 24)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Recent Books : Digest of the Month's Reading George Farwell , Dora Birtles , 1946 single work review
— Appears in: The Australasian Book News and Library Journal , August vol. 1 no. 2 1946; (p. 57-61)

— Review of Beyond the Hill Lies China : Scenes from a Medical Life in Australia Herbert Michael Moran 1945 single work novel ; Twenty Great Australian Stories 1946 anthology short story
Romantic Pattern That Is Australia Firmin McKinnon , 1940 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 30 March 1940; (p. 4)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Untitled 1940 single work review
— Appears in: Walkabout , 1 August vol. 6 no. 10 1940; (p. 42, 45, 47)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Untitled 1939 single work review
— Appears in: The North Queensland Register , 15 July 1939; (p. 12)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Publishers Write About Their Outstanding New Books Collins , Hutchinson , Herbert Jenkins , 1937 single work correspondence
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 March vol. 9 no. 3 1937; (p. 42-43)
Publishers' lists of new releases and reprints. Some briefs comments on some subjects. Collins and Herbert Jenkins include prices.
Untitled 1937 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 27 March 1937; (p. 234)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Untitled 1939 single work review
— Appears in: The North Queensland Register , 15 July 1939; (p. 12)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Romantic Pattern That Is Australia Firmin McKinnon , 1940 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 30 March 1940; (p. 4)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Untitled 1940 single work review
— Appears in: Walkabout , 1 August vol. 6 no. 10 1940; (p. 42, 45, 47)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Riot of Colour ... in Paperback Parade 1968 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 14 September 1968; (p. 24)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
New in Paperback 1969 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 25 January 1969; (p. 15)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Untitled Maggie MacPhee , 1977 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29 January 1977; (p. 19)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Australia Felix I. M. Foster , 1937 single work review
— Appears in: Desiderata , 2 August no. 33 1937; (p. 4-6)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
A Woman on the North X. T. , 1937 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 2 June vol. 58 no. 2990 1937; (p. 2)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Untitled Tony Maniaty , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1-2 July 1995; (p. rev 9)

— Review of The Great Australian Loneliness Ernestine Hill 1937 single work autobiography
Metamorphosis : Travel Narratives and Aboriginal/Non-Aboriginal Relations in the 1930s Paul Miller , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 75 2002; (p. 85-92, notes 189-190)
Recent Books : Digest of the Month's Reading George Farwell , Dora Birtles , 1946 single work review
— Appears in: The Australasian Book News and Library Journal , August vol. 1 no. 2 1946; (p. 57-61)

— Review of Beyond the Hill Lies China : Scenes from a Medical Life in Australia Herbert Michael Moran 1945 single work novel ; Twenty Great Australian Stories 1946 anthology short story
Publishers Write About Their Outstanding New Books Collins , Hutchinson , Herbert Jenkins , 1937 single work correspondence
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 March vol. 9 no. 3 1937; (p. 42-43)
Publishers' lists of new releases and reprints. Some briefs comments on some subjects. Collins and Herbert Jenkins include prices.
Outstanding New Publications and Best Sellers 1937 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 15 June vol. 9 no. 6 1937; (p. 88)
Panorama : The Live, The Dead and The Living Meaghan Morris , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Island in the Stream : Myths of Place in Australian Culture 1988; (p. 160-187)
Ask the Leyland Brothers : Instructional TV, Travel and Popular Memory Chris Healy , Alison Huber , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 24 no. 3 2010; (p. 389 - 398)
'This article considers television made by two Australian brothers, Mike and Mal Leyland, specifically their long-running series from the 1970s, Ask the Leyland Brothers. The program used viewer participation to set an itinerary for the brothers, who travelled extensively by car to film responses to viewers' questions about Australia. Mike and Mal Leyland brought images of the Australian countryside to very large television audiences, providing entertainment and instructions about how to travel, appreciate and consume the country they and their audience lived in. While this example of 'instructional TV' was extremely popular in its 10-year run on television, and is fondly remembered by audiences, it is not prominent in the 'official' discourse of Australia's TV history; thus, it poses a particular set of questions about television and cultural memory.' (Author's abstrat)
Representing Australian Space in The Overlanders Elizabeth Webby , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 115-123)
This paper will examine the influence of Watt's representation of Australian space in The Overlanders on other films made in Australia during the 1950s, including Charles Chauvel's Jedda (1955) and Jack Lee's Robbery Under Arms (1957)...(From author's abstract p. 115)
White Journeys into Black Country Tracy Spencer , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 149-161)
'Rebecca Forbes and Jim Page were English immigrants who lived and died amongst the Adnyamathanha people of the northern Flinders Ranges in the first half of the twentieth century. The first time I saw their two graves there - just the two of them, on their won up the hill, a little above the community at Nepabunna - I asked the obvious question: How did they come to be there? The journeys involved in these trajectories - immigration from England to Australia, migration from the coast to the inland - are the focus of this paper.' (Author's introduction, 149)
Train Spotting : Reconciliation and Long-Distance Rail Travel in Australia Peter Bishop , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 162-174)
The Transnational Fantasy : The Case of James Cowan Peter Matthews , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 67-73)
'Recent criticism has seen the rise of an approach to literature that views texts as products of 'transnationalism,' a move that arises from a growing sense that, in a global age, authors should not be bounded by the traditional limits of national culture. In her book Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism Beyond the Nation (2006), for instance, Rebecca Walkowitz looks at how this trend has evolved in world Anglophone literature, extending from canonical writers like Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf to such contemporary authors as Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and W.G. Sebald. In the field of Australian literature, the question of transnationalism is often linked to issues of postcolonialism, as reflected in recent critical works like Graham Huggan's Australian Literature: Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism (2007) and Nathanael O'Reilly's edited collection Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature (2010), both of which examine how Australian literature and culture have metamorphosed in the new global context. While there is little doubt that world literature has been affected in important ways by this broadening of literary stage, there seems to be a widespread conflation between two similar but different terms: the transnational and transcultural. For while it is true that the culture of many countries arises from a cosmopolitan and diverse assortment of influences, this loosening of cultural boundaries between nations is far from being simultaneous with the decline of the state.' (Author's introduction)
New Australian Books Frederick T. Macartney , 1937 single work
— Appears in: All About Books , 15 June vol. 9 no. 6 1937; (p. 85-87)

Macartney takes Palmer to task for his "revision" of Furphy's work and discusses the working relationship between the author and Stephens at first publication; praises the reissue of Lawson's prose; takes issue with Hill's credibility and describes Glass' style as "high-falutin".

Foreword : Bush Jewels Still Sparkle Elizabeth Swanson , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 15-16 June 1991; (p. rev 7)
Ernestine Hill and the North : Reading Race and Indigeneity In the Great Australian Loneliness and The Territory Adam Gall , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , 1 June vol. 37 no. 2 2013; (p. 194-207)
'This article examines the work of Ernestine Hill (1899–1972), an Australian journalist, travel writer, and broadcaster. It begins by elaborating some of the ways in which Hill's life and work have been given scholarly treatment previously, and then it proposes a reading of her work in terms of the themes of race and belonging—in particular, the relationship between whiteness and indigeneity in her written depictions of Australia's far north. The article draws upon the conceptual framework developed by Terry Goldie and Penelope Ingram to read Hill's collection of travel pieces,The Great Australian Loneliness (1937), and her historical writing in The Territory (1951).' (Authors abstract)
American Servicemen Find Ernestine Hill in Their Kitbags : The Great Australian Loneliness Anna Johnston , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 84-90)
‘The Great Australian Loneliness’ : On Writing an Inter-Asian Biography of Ernestine Hill Meaghan Morris , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Intercultural Studies , vol. 35 no. 3 2014; (p. 238-249)
'The Great Australian Loneliness (1937) is a famous book of travel reportage by Ernestine Hill (1899–1972), a key figure in the mid-twentieth century shaping of popular media culture in Australia. Through her journalism she disseminated debate about the great public issues of her day: the status of Aboriginal peoples, immigration from Asia and the state’s role in national development. In this paper, I take the White Australian ‘loneliness’ her title invokes as a methodological challenge to situate both her life and the ethnically diverse sociability she actually described in an inter-Asian framework of analysis capable of unsettling those bonds between ethnicity and nationality that many twentieth-century writers worked so hard to secure. In the process, I argue for an ‘Australian Asian’ approach to cultural history.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 14 Oct 2016 07:30:56
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