y The Kangaroo Hunters, or, Adventures in the Bush single work   children's fiction   children's   adventure  
Issue Details: First known date: 1858 1858
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

Notes

  • Epigraph:

    'Light and limber, upwards driven,

    On the hoar crag quivering;

    Or through gorges thunder-riven,

    Leaps she with her airy spring!

    But behind her still, the foe-

    Near, and near the deadly bow!'

    -Schiller, translated by Bulwer.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Routledge , 1858 .
      Extent: iv, 444p.[8] leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus.
      Reprinted: 1859 , 1860
    • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Porter and Coates , 1858 .
      Link: Full text document Digital copy of 1858 edition. See copyright information on site for any usage restrictions.
      Extent: xii, 463 p.p.
      Edition info: Alta edition.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Illustrated frontispiece.
    • Boston, Massachusetts,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Crosby, Nichols & Lee , 1860 .
      Extent: vii, 463p.p.
      Description: [7] leaves of plates : illus.
      Reprinted: 1861 , 1864
Alternative title: Voyage au Pays des Kangarous
Language: French

Works about this Work

Britishness and Australian Popular Fiction : From the Mid-Nineteenth to the Mid-Twentieth Centuries Hsu-Ming Teo , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 46-66)
'The analysis offered here is [...], a panoptic perspective of the tangled skeins of literary imagination and imitation, gender and genre requirements, editorial control, market considerations and the sheer economics of the international book trade that knotted Australian popular literature into the cultural and economic fabric of the British empire.' (47)
Competing Discourses in 'The Kangaroo Hunters' Robin Pope , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 8 no. 3 1998; (p. 36-46)

Pope's detailed analysis of the novel, The Kangaroo Hunters, or, Adventures in the Bush, contends that while author Bowman 'makes her protest about received ideas regarding masculinity and empire, it is a modified statement which is itself subverted by the power of the dominant discourses which construct imperial discourse.' (46). Pope discusses the composition of Bowman's fictive constructions arguing that stories offer 'moral' truths rather than verifiable truths or probabilities and links this to the tendency of women writers to (traditionally) write in genres in which the 'truth status of the work was less questioned', such as nursery rhymes and fairy tales. In 1858, women writing about travel adventures for the young was rare and 'probably risky' considering that 'accounts of travel which demonstrated women as confronting and overcoming difficult circumstances in their own were presumed to be lies or gross exaggerations' (36-37). Pope critiques the text from the position that 'within imperial discourse other discourses circulate within their own systematic sets of ideas' and establishes how Bowman engages with discourses of race and (white) racial superiority, religion and Christianity, science and class in ways which 'frequently exceed or transgress the limits and conventions of what was accepted at the time' (37). However Pope argues that the discursive frameworks which the text attempts to challenge ultimately prevail in reinforcing the fundamental ideologies of masculine dominance (46).

Captivating Narratives : Reeling in the Nineteenth-Century Child Reader Robin Pope , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: La Trobe Library Journal , Spring no. 60 1997; (p. 134-147)
Aussie Bards and Pom Reviewers : English Reviewers and Australian Writers in the Nineteenth Century Barry Argyle , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aspects of Australian Fiction : Essays Presented to John Colmer, Professor Emeritus of English, The University of Adelaide 1990; (p. 1-16)
Captivating Narratives : Reeling in the Nineteenth-Century Child Reader Robin Pope , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: La Trobe Library Journal , Spring no. 60 1997; (p. 134-147)
Britishness and Australian Popular Fiction : From the Mid-Nineteenth to the Mid-Twentieth Centuries Hsu-Ming Teo , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 46-66)
'The analysis offered here is [...], a panoptic perspective of the tangled skeins of literary imagination and imitation, gender and genre requirements, editorial control, market considerations and the sheer economics of the international book trade that knotted Australian popular literature into the cultural and economic fabric of the British empire.' (47)
Aussie Bards and Pom Reviewers : English Reviewers and Australian Writers in the Nineteenth Century Barry Argyle , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aspects of Australian Fiction : Essays Presented to John Colmer, Professor Emeritus of English, The University of Adelaide 1990; (p. 1-16)
Competing Discourses in 'The Kangaroo Hunters' Robin Pope , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 8 no. 3 1998; (p. 36-46)

Pope's detailed analysis of the novel, The Kangaroo Hunters, or, Adventures in the Bush, contends that while author Bowman 'makes her protest about received ideas regarding masculinity and empire, it is a modified statement which is itself subverted by the power of the dominant discourses which construct imperial discourse.' (46). Pope discusses the composition of Bowman's fictive constructions arguing that stories offer 'moral' truths rather than verifiable truths or probabilities and links this to the tendency of women writers to (traditionally) write in genres in which the 'truth status of the work was less questioned', such as nursery rhymes and fairy tales. In 1858, women writing about travel adventures for the young was rare and 'probably risky' considering that 'accounts of travel which demonstrated women as confronting and overcoming difficult circumstances in their own were presumed to be lies or gross exaggerations' (36-37). Pope critiques the text from the position that 'within imperial discourse other discourses circulate within their own systematic sets of ideas' and establishes how Bowman engages with discourses of race and (white) racial superiority, religion and Christianity, science and class in ways which 'frequently exceed or transgress the limits and conventions of what was accepted at the time' (37). However Pope argues that the discursive frameworks which the text attempts to challenge ultimately prevail in reinforcing the fundamental ideologies of masculine dominance (46).

Last amended 5 Mar 2010 09:53:42
Settings:
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
  • Bush,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X