Always Was Always Will Be single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 1993 1993
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

‘This article might come as a surprise to some, but to many of my colleagues, both Black and white, who know me more intimately, the following is a brief synopsis of my construction of Aboriginality in response to Bain Attwood's 'Portrait of an Aboriginal as an Artist: Sally Morgan and the Construction of Aboriginality'.’ (Opening lines.)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Teaching Indigenous Literature : An Ethics of Voice Alice Healy-Ingram , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 70-94)
'My first class in teaching Indigenous literature was beset with a challenge: 'Why are you quoting that songline on overhead?! An Aboriginal student asked me, deeply offended, when I introduced a pre-scripted lecture on Aboriginal 'text'. 'It is not to be taken away from its context. It is sung, not written; it is performed with dancing and has a meaning that you would not understand!' My bravado failed and I gave her the stage. She was right. I had unwittingly performed a 'colonial' act of misappropriation. The pressures of early career academic life were my rather feeble excuse - at the last minute I had been asked to take over the unit from a retiring colleague on top of my normal teaching load, was finishing, at night, my PhD on Australian novel to film adaptation, and was processing all sorts of new realities. I'd been instructed by this colleague to show an 'example' of a songline as an introduction to a unit called 'Australian Society, Aboriginal Voices'.' (Author's introduction, 70)
Anti-Nativism in Australian Indigenous Literature Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kultura Historia Globalizacja , no. 7 2010; (p. 53-64)
'What in today's literary discourse are the reality and the world created by the words: nativism, nativity, the native, native? Why do we still speak and communicate with them and use them in different contexts, even though we know that these words often carry a negative emotional meaning load, taking us to spaces, times, and experiences of colonial suffering, despite their basis in academic arguments. In Australia such issues have been addressed by many Indigenous writers, amongst them — M. Langton, A. Moreton- Robinson, Mudrooroo, C. Watego, T. Birch, F. Bayet — Charlton, to name just a few.' (Author's introduction)
Whose Speaking or Writing is More Authentic and Authoritative? A Reply to Jo Robertson Subhash Jaireth , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Spring vol. 8 no. 2 1996; (p. 141-144)
Authority and Authenticity in Aboriginal Literature Jo Robertson , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Spring vol. 8 no. 2 1996; (p. 145-149)
Who Speaks for Whom? : Mikhail Bakhtin and the Idea of Chronotopic Nature of Speaking and Listening Subhash Jaireth , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Summer vol. 7 no. 3 1995; (p. 78-83)
Talking to; Talking About; or Talking for? Enunciative Politics for Non-Aboriginal Literary Critics Jo Robertson , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Summer vol. 7 no. 3 1995; (p. 84-92)
Sally Morgan: A Black Tall Poppy? Elizabeth Reed , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , October vol. 25 no. 101 1993; (p. 637-639)
Anti-Nativism in Australian Indigenous Literature Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kultura Historia Globalizacja , no. 7 2010; (p. 53-64)
'What in today's literary discourse are the reality and the world created by the words: nativism, nativity, the native, native? Why do we still speak and communicate with them and use them in different contexts, even though we know that these words often carry a negative emotional meaning load, taking us to spaces, times, and experiences of colonial suffering, despite their basis in academic arguments. In Australia such issues have been addressed by many Indigenous writers, amongst them — M. Langton, A. Moreton- Robinson, Mudrooroo, C. Watego, T. Birch, F. Bayet — Charlton, to name just a few.' (Author's introduction)
Teaching Indigenous Literature : An Ethics of Voice Alice Healy-Ingram , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 70-94)
'My first class in teaching Indigenous literature was beset with a challenge: 'Why are you quoting that songline on overhead?! An Aboriginal student asked me, deeply offended, when I introduced a pre-scripted lecture on Aboriginal 'text'. 'It is not to be taken away from its context. It is sung, not written; it is performed with dancing and has a meaning that you would not understand!' My bravado failed and I gave her the stage. She was right. I had unwittingly performed a 'colonial' act of misappropriation. The pressures of early career academic life were my rather feeble excuse - at the last minute I had been asked to take over the unit from a retiring colleague on top of my normal teaching load, was finishing, at night, my PhD on Australian novel to film adaptation, and was processing all sorts of new realities. I'd been instructed by this colleague to show an 'example' of a songline as an introduction to a unit called 'Australian Society, Aboriginal Voices'.' (Author's introduction, 70)
Whose Speaking or Writing is More Authentic and Authoritative? A Reply to Jo Robertson Subhash Jaireth , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Spring vol. 8 no. 2 1996; (p. 141-144)
Authority and Authenticity in Aboriginal Literature Jo Robertson , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Spring vol. 8 no. 2 1996; (p. 145-149)
Sally Morgan: A Black Tall Poppy? Elizabeth Reed , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , October vol. 25 no. 101 1993; (p. 637-639)
Who Speaks for Whom? : Mikhail Bakhtin and the Idea of Chronotopic Nature of Speaking and Listening Subhash Jaireth , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Summer vol. 7 no. 3 1995; (p. 78-83)
Talking to; Talking About; or Talking for? Enunciative Politics for Non-Aboriginal Literary Critics Jo Robertson , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Summer vol. 7 no. 3 1995; (p. 84-92)
Last amended 22 Jan 2014 07:29:40
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