Alternative title: Lasseter's Last Ride
Is part of Ion L. Idriess : Frontier Edition series - publisher Ion L. Idriess : National Edition series - publisher
Issue Details: First known date: 1931 1931
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Notes

  • Also available in braille and sound recording formats.
  • Based on accounts by members of the expedition, Lasseter's letters, and records and correspondence of the Central Australian Gold Exploration Company.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1931 .
      Extent: [iv], 228p.
      Description: illus.; ports.; maps on end papers.
      Note/s:
      • Some reprints are prefaced by a foreword by Herbert Basedow; pagination varies in reprints.
      • Reprinted more than 31 times between 1931 and 1950.
      • Dedication: To the Pioneer Spirit which Never Dies.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Jonathan Cape , 1936 .
      Extent: 237p.
      Description: illus., map.
      Reprinted: 1940
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1950-1959 .
      Extent: xiv, 267 p., [15] p. of platesp.
      Edition info: Frontier edition, 10
      Description: illus,;aps; ports.
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1973 .
      Extent: 185p.
      Note/s:
      • Part of A & R Classics series
      • Reprint of 1931 edition.
      ISBN: 0207128782 (Pbk), 0207128790
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Angus and Robertson , 1980 .
      Extent: 185p.
      Note/s:
      • Part of Australian Classics series
      ISBN: 0207141649
Alternative title: Hoodoo : med en modern forsknings- och guldgrävarexpedition till inre Centralaustralien
Language: Swedish
    • Lund,
      c
      Sweden,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Sundqvist and Emond , 1934 .
      Extent: 238p.
      Description: illus., [54]p. of plates, facsims., 1 map, ports.

Works about this Work

Lasseter's Last Ride and the Gothic Narrative of Failure Simon Ryan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , September vol. 39 no. 3 2015; (p. 381-395)
Portals to a New World : H.P. Lovecraft Ventures to the Great Sandy Desert Peter Pierce , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 16-22)
Canine 1 : Bureaucracy 0 : The Life and Almost Death of Horrie the Wog-Dog Paul Genoni , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 98-105)
Armchair Tourism : The Popularity of Australian Travel Writing Richard White , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 182-202)
'Richard White examines the 'uneasy relationship' between the genre of travel writing and the notions of the popular. He considers the way in which 'Australian travel writers negotiated the pitfalls of popularity' and argues that 'a number of Australian writers broke with these conventions and willingly embraced the popular.' He takes Frank Clune and Colin Simpson as case studies to examine how their writing courted a popular mass market in Australia and created a genre where ordinary tourist was hero.' (Editor's foreword xiv)
Diary, 1930-c1931 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: ONE Hundred : A Tribute to the Mitchell Library 2010; (p. 32-33)
Literature in the Arid Zone Tom Lynch , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Littoral Zone : Australian Contexts and Their Writers 2007; (p. 70-92)
This chapter surveys and assesses from an ecocentric perspective some representative literary portrayals of the Australian deserts. Generally, it contrasts works that portray the desert as an alien, hostile, and undifferentiated void with works that recognise and value the biological particularities of specific desert places. It explores the literature of three dominant cultural orientations to the deserts: pastoralism, mining, and traversal. It concludes with a consideration of several multi-voiced and/or multi-genred bioregionally informed works that suggests fruitful directions for more ecocentric literary approaches. (abstract taken from The Littoral Zone)
Representing Australian Space in The Overlanders Elizabeth Webby , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 115-123)
This paper will examine the influence of Watt's representation of Australian space in The Overlanders on other films made in Australia during the 1950s, including Charles Chauvel's Jedda (1955) and Jack Lee's Robbery Under Arms (1957)...(From author's abstract p. 115)
y Ion Idriess Beverley Eley , Potts Point : ETT Imprint , 1995 Z550010 1995 single work biography
y Who are We? The Australian Quest for Literary Identity Richard Scott Carr , Ann Arbor : University Microfilms International , 1994 Z67137 1994 single work thesis

'This full-fledged literary and critical history of Australian fiction specifies the governing themes of the fiction and its various schools; it analyzes the evolution of a canon of Australian fiction in literary history; and it demonstrates the way Australian writers and scholars have been forced to adjust their beliefs about authentic Australian literature since the emergence of Aboriginal imaginative writing in the 1960s. This study presents and analyzes the longstanding battle of Australian literature for academic and popular recognition in Australia, a struggle mirroring the larger national quest for a confident identity. The "Emigrant Mechanic," narrator of Alexander Harris' Settlers and Convicts, or Recollections of Sixteen Years Labour in the Australian Backwoods (1847), identifies themes that have persisted in Australian culture and literature--the fascination with the landscape, the rise of the New Australian, the mateship social dynamic.

'Those themes persist, for example, in the 'bush fiction' of Henry Lawson, Joseph Furphy, and their successors, fiction focusing on survival, as bush dwellers fight an environment bent on defeating human effort. Harris adds another major theme that resonates in Australia's canonical fiction when, despite his avowed aim to celebrate the Australian experience, he returns homesick to England. Much of Australian fiction is a story of leaving; the hero--the exceptional person--must escape Australia to find fulfillment.

'Those who stay, like Meg in Ethel Turner's Seven Little Australians, are best served by learning to become proper Imperial citizens. The emergence of Aboriginal fiction, poetry, and drama in the 1960s introduces a new story and theme into Australian literature, the search for the Aboriginal soul lost or disrupted with the arrival of the Europeans, when the narrator in Mudrooroo's (Colin Johnson's) landmark Wild Cat Falling (1965) breaks from the cycle of prison-release-recapture. Recognizing his heritage and recovering his Aboriginal self, he provides--in the Aboriginal journey to reclaim the soul--a potent literary counter to the cultural sense of displacement and inferiority evident throughout Australian canonical fiction. In recognizing and embracing the Aboriginal spirit of the continent, Australian writers and readers can hope to resolve their identity quest.' (National Library of Australia catalogue record)

Chronicler of the Great Inland Clement Semmler , 1990 single work biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 29-30 September 1990; (p. rev 4)
Popular Perceptions of an Unpopular People, 1929-1945 Adam Shoemaker , 1989 single work criticism
— Appears in: Black Words, White Page : Aboriginal Literature 1929-1988 1989; (p. 39-62)
This chapter examines works written between 1929 and 1945 by non-Aboriginal authors representing Aboriginality. Works analysed in detail are Coonardoo (1929) by Katharine Susannah Prichard, Capricornia (1938) by Xavier Herbert, Lasseter's Last Ride: An Epic of Central Australia (1931) by Ion Idriess, The Passing of the Aborigines (1938) by Daisy Bates and Native Legends (1929) by David Unaipon. Shoemaker argues the following points: Firstly, that there is a tendency for academics to overemphasise the importance of works by Prichard and Herbert as indicators of a supposedly new and enlightened view. Secondly, that by highlighting such works as beacons of enlightenment, academic criticism has cast a shadow over the extremely popular works of historical fiction by Idriess. And thirdly, that a number of other popular works of literature written and published between 1929 and 1945, for example, Daisy Bates's The Passing of the Aborigines, still exerted some influence on Australian readers as late as the 1960s. Finally, Shoemaker's analysis concludes with David Unaipon, who published during this period, was almost totally ignored until the 1970s, and even now still deserves far more study than he has received.
News Value of Criticism George Adie Ferguson , 1947 single work
— Appears in: The Australasian Book News and Library Journal , March vol. 1 no. 9 1947; (p. 418)
Lasseter's Ghost Frank Clune , 1944 single work biography
— Appears in: The Red Heart : Sagas of Centralia 1944; (p. 15-29)
Although 'Henry' Lasseter died in 1931, taking with him the secret of his purported 'reef' of gold, rumours of him having staged his death persisted. Clune's interest was so piqued that he eagerly accepted an invitation to join a prospecting party to the region where Lasseter had worked. Clune meets several locals, including Koorin-Jaminny, a 'Luritcha' Aboriginal man whose tribe had nursed Lasseter through his last days and buried him, and Bob Buck, the Station owner who searched for Lasseter, learned of his fate from the Luritcha people, and recovered his few personal effects.
Untitled 1936 single work prose
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 May vol. 8 no. 5 1936; (p. 76)
Australian Books Abroad 1936 single work review
— Appears in: The Central Queensland Herald , 6 August 1936; (p. 14)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
The A.L.S. Monthly Prize Review Ken Barratt , 1934 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 14 February vol. 6 no. 2 1934; (p. 46)

— Review of The Partners John Lovegood 1933 single work novel
Australian Literature Society [Meeting Report] Doris Hayball , 1933 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 September vol. 5 no. 9 1933; (p. 150)
Fellowship of Australian Writers [Meeting Report] Neil J. Myers , 1932 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 September vol. 4 no. 9 1932; (p. 149)
Untitled L. A. Sigsworth , 1932 single work review
— Appears in: The Central Queensland Herald , 19 May 1932; (p. 12)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Untitled 1932 single work review
— Appears in: The Central Queensland Herald , 18 February 1932; (p. 12)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Untitled L. A. Sigsworth , 1932 single work review
— Appears in: The Central Queensland Herald , 19 May 1932; (p. 12)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Untitled 1931 single work review
— Appears in: The Daily Mail , 26 September 1931; (p. 15)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Untitled Freda Barrymore , 1931 single work review
— Appears in: The North Queensland Register , 3 October 1931; (p. 55)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Lasseter's Last Ride 1931 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 15 October 1931; (p. 44)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Untitled 1932 single work review
— Appears in: The Central Queensland Herald , 18 February 1932; (p. 12)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Lasseter's Last Ride 1932 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 7 April 1932; (p. 44)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Untitled Freda Barrymore , 1932 single work review
— Appears in: The North Queensland Register , 9 April 1932; (p. 40)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Australian Books Abroad 1936 single work review
— Appears in: The Central Queensland Herald , 6 August 1936; (p. 14)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Untitled 1931 single work review
— Appears in: Northern Territory Times , 11 December 1931; (p. 3)

— Review of Lasseter's Last Ride : An Epic of Central Australian Gold Discovery Ion L. Idriess 1931 single work biography
Best Sellers and A.B.A. Recommendations 1931 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 14 November vol. 3 no. 11 1931; (p. 218)
Fellowship of Australian Writers [Meeting Report] Neil J. Myers , 1932 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 September vol. 4 no. 9 1932; (p. 149)
Australian Literature Society [Meeting Report] Doris Hayball , 1933 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 September vol. 5 no. 9 1933; (p. 150)
The A.L.S. Monthly Prize Review Ken Barratt , 1934 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 14 February vol. 6 no. 2 1934; (p. 46)

— Review of The Partners John Lovegood 1933 single work novel
Untitled 1936 single work prose
— Appears in: All About Books , 12 May vol. 8 no. 5 1936; (p. 76)
Literature in the Arid Zone Tom Lynch , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Littoral Zone : Australian Contexts and Their Writers 2007; (p. 70-92)
This chapter surveys and assesses from an ecocentric perspective some representative literary portrayals of the Australian deserts. Generally, it contrasts works that portray the desert as an alien, hostile, and undifferentiated void with works that recognise and value the biological particularities of specific desert places. It explores the literature of three dominant cultural orientations to the deserts: pastoralism, mining, and traversal. It concludes with a consideration of several multi-voiced and/or multi-genred bioregionally informed works that suggests fruitful directions for more ecocentric literary approaches. (abstract taken from The Littoral Zone)
Lasseter's Ghost Frank Clune , 1944 single work biography
— Appears in: The Red Heart : Sagas of Centralia 1944; (p. 15-29)
Although 'Henry' Lasseter died in 1931, taking with him the secret of his purported 'reef' of gold, rumours of him having staged his death persisted. Clune's interest was so piqued that he eagerly accepted an invitation to join a prospecting party to the region where Lasseter had worked. Clune meets several locals, including Koorin-Jaminny, a 'Luritcha' Aboriginal man whose tribe had nursed Lasseter through his last days and buried him, and Bob Buck, the Station owner who searched for Lasseter, learned of his fate from the Luritcha people, and recovered his few personal effects.
Diary, 1930-c1931 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: ONE Hundred : A Tribute to the Mitchell Library 2010; (p. 32-33)
Representing Australian Space in The Overlanders Elizabeth Webby , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 115-123)
This paper will examine the influence of Watt's representation of Australian space in The Overlanders on other films made in Australia during the 1950s, including Charles Chauvel's Jedda (1955) and Jack Lee's Robbery Under Arms (1957)...(From author's abstract p. 115)
Armchair Tourism : The Popularity of Australian Travel Writing Richard White , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 182-202)
'Richard White examines the 'uneasy relationship' between the genre of travel writing and the notions of the popular. He considers the way in which 'Australian travel writers negotiated the pitfalls of popularity' and argues that 'a number of Australian writers broke with these conventions and willingly embraced the popular.' He takes Frank Clune and Colin Simpson as case studies to examine how their writing courted a popular mass market in Australia and created a genre where ordinary tourist was hero.' (Editor's foreword xiv)
y Who are We? The Australian Quest for Literary Identity Richard Scott Carr , Ann Arbor : University Microfilms International , 1994 Z67137 1994 single work thesis

'This full-fledged literary and critical history of Australian fiction specifies the governing themes of the fiction and its various schools; it analyzes the evolution of a canon of Australian fiction in literary history; and it demonstrates the way Australian writers and scholars have been forced to adjust their beliefs about authentic Australian literature since the emergence of Aboriginal imaginative writing in the 1960s. This study presents and analyzes the longstanding battle of Australian literature for academic and popular recognition in Australia, a struggle mirroring the larger national quest for a confident identity. The "Emigrant Mechanic," narrator of Alexander Harris' Settlers and Convicts, or Recollections of Sixteen Years Labour in the Australian Backwoods (1847), identifies themes that have persisted in Australian culture and literature--the fascination with the landscape, the rise of the New Australian, the mateship social dynamic.

'Those themes persist, for example, in the 'bush fiction' of Henry Lawson, Joseph Furphy, and their successors, fiction focusing on survival, as bush dwellers fight an environment bent on defeating human effort. Harris adds another major theme that resonates in Australia's canonical fiction when, despite his avowed aim to celebrate the Australian experience, he returns homesick to England. Much of Australian fiction is a story of leaving; the hero--the exceptional person--must escape Australia to find fulfillment.

'Those who stay, like Meg in Ethel Turner's Seven Little Australians, are best served by learning to become proper Imperial citizens. The emergence of Aboriginal fiction, poetry, and drama in the 1960s introduces a new story and theme into Australian literature, the search for the Aboriginal soul lost or disrupted with the arrival of the Europeans, when the narrator in Mudrooroo's (Colin Johnson's) landmark Wild Cat Falling (1965) breaks from the cycle of prison-release-recapture. Recognizing his heritage and recovering his Aboriginal self, he provides--in the Aboriginal journey to reclaim the soul--a potent literary counter to the cultural sense of displacement and inferiority evident throughout Australian canonical fiction. In recognizing and embracing the Aboriginal spirit of the continent, Australian writers and readers can hope to resolve their identity quest.' (National Library of Australia catalogue record)

Chronicler of the Great Inland Clement Semmler , 1990 single work biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 29-30 September 1990; (p. rev 4)
News Value of Criticism George Adie Ferguson , 1947 single work
— Appears in: The Australasian Book News and Library Journal , March vol. 1 no. 9 1947; (p. 418)
Popular Perceptions of an Unpopular People, 1929-1945 Adam Shoemaker , 1989 single work criticism
— Appears in: Black Words, White Page : Aboriginal Literature 1929-1988 1989; (p. 39-62)
This chapter examines works written between 1929 and 1945 by non-Aboriginal authors representing Aboriginality. Works analysed in detail are Coonardoo (1929) by Katharine Susannah Prichard, Capricornia (1938) by Xavier Herbert, Lasseter's Last Ride: An Epic of Central Australia (1931) by Ion Idriess, The Passing of the Aborigines (1938) by Daisy Bates and Native Legends (1929) by David Unaipon. Shoemaker argues the following points: Firstly, that there is a tendency for academics to overemphasise the importance of works by Prichard and Herbert as indicators of a supposedly new and enlightened view. Secondly, that by highlighting such works as beacons of enlightenment, academic criticism has cast a shadow over the extremely popular works of historical fiction by Idriess. And thirdly, that a number of other popular works of literature written and published between 1929 and 1945, for example, Daisy Bates's The Passing of the Aborigines, still exerted some influence on Australian readers as late as the 1960s. Finally, Shoemaker's analysis concludes with David Unaipon, who published during this period, was almost totally ignored until the 1970s, and even now still deserves far more study than he has received.
y Ion Idriess Beverley Eley , Potts Point : ETT Imprint , 1995 Z550010 1995 single work biography
Portals to a New World : H.P. Lovecraft Ventures to the Great Sandy Desert Peter Pierce , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 16-22)
Canine 1 : Bureaucracy 0 : The Life and Almost Death of Horrie the Wog-Dog Paul Genoni , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 98-105)
Lasseter's Last Ride and the Gothic Narrative of Failure Simon Ryan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , September vol. 39 no. 3 2015; (p. 381-395)
Last amended 5 Aug 2004 12:53:46
Subjects:
  • Central Northern Territory, Northern Territory,
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
Settings:
  • 1930s
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