y Oyster single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1996 1996
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Outer Maroo, a small opal mining town in the Australian outback, is stewing in heat, drought, and guilty anxiety. Some ghastly cataclysm has occurred on the opal fields, but this is a taboo subject. When, from time to time, strangers arrive looking for missing children, they mysteriously disappear. Until the day two strangers, on the trail of a missing son and a daughter, refuse to succumb to accidents. The repressed secrets begin to dislodge themselves. Once the walls against the past begin to come down, nothing can stop the avalanche. And at the heart of this mystery is the cult Messiah, Oyster, dressed in white, sexually compelling, and preaching the end of time.

Notes

  • Sound recording, braille and large print editions available
  • This book appeared on the New York Times' "Editors' Choice" and Notable Books List ; and was a finalist for the Trillium Award in Canada.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Virago , 1996 .
      Extent: 402p.
      Description: bibl.
      Note/s:
      • Epigraph: 'We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love one another' - Jonathan Swift.
      ISBN: 1860491235
    • Milsons Point, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Knopf , 1996 .
      Extent: 402p.
      ISBN: 0091833124
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Knopf , 1996 .
      Extent: 402p.
      ISBN: 0676970141
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Virago , 1996 .
      Extent: 453p.
      ISBN: 1860491634
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Virago , 1997 .
      Extent: 453p.
      ISBN: 1860491634 (pbk.)
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Vintage Canada , 1997 .
      Extent: 402p.
      Edition info: 1st Vintage Canada edition.
      ISBN: 0676970311
    • New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      W. W. Norton , 1998 .
      Extent: 400p.
      Edition info: 1st American ed
      ISBN: 0393046184
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      W. W. Norton , 1999 .
      Extent: 400p.
      ISBN: 0393319369 (pbk)
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2005 .
      Extent: 435, 17p.p.
      Description: illus., port.
      Note/s:
      • Bibliography : p. 435.
      ISBN: 0732281873
Alternative title: Oyster : Roman
Language: German

Works about this Work

Due Preparations for Paradise : or, The Plague Now According to Hany Abu-Assad and Janette Turner Hospital Helga Ramsey-Kurz , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Engaging with Literature of Commitment : The Worldly Scholar (Volume 2) 2012; (p. 217-230)
Inside Out in the Land Down Under : Reading Trauma through Janette Turner Hospital's Oyster Isabel Fraile , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Splintered Glass : Facets of Trauma in the Post-Colony and Beyond 2011; (p. 221-243)
Isabel Fraile claims that 'While a thoroughly enjoyable and gripping experience, reading Janette Turner Hospital's Oyster (1996) often manages to feel, at the same time, like reading a handbook of trauma theory.' (p 221)
Australian Infernos : Janette Turner Hospital's Translation of Dante's Hell into Contemporary Australia Mary McLaughlin , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cultural Transformations : Perspectives on Translocations in a Global Age 2010; (p. 51-72)
The Genesis of Oyster : Janette Turner Hospital's Outback Odyssey Janette Turner Hospital , 2010 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Found in Fryer : Stories from the Fryer Library Collection 2010; (p. 188-189)
Hospital discusses two trips to outback Queensland which were inspiration for her novel Oyster.
‘Thick with Coded Testaments’ : Representations of Postcolonial Space in Janette Turner Hospital’s Oyster Nicholas Dunlop , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 75-92)
Interview with Janet Turner Hospital Cheryl Jorgensen (interviewer), 2010 single work interview
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 36 no. 1 & 2 2010; (p. 186-187)
y Rainforest Narratives : The Work of Janette Turner Hospital David Callahan , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2009 Z1611963 2009 single work criticism

'Rainforests evoke vivid imagery; the profusion of intertwined trees and undergrowth both invites and confounds exploration. Acclaimed writer Janette Turner Hospital conjures up a rainforest for readers by weaving threads of connection and meaning into a labyrinth of characters and plot lines. From The Ivory Swing to Orpheus Lost, Hospital's award-winning novels and short stories have challenged and intrigued readers for over twenty-five years. Hospital's books tackle complex themes of dislocation, identity, ethics and the nature of reality, wrapping around a reader like rainforest creepers, remaining attached long after the last page is turned.

In this groundbreaking work of literary criticism, David Callahan signposts and analyses the major themes scattered throughout Janette Turner Hospital's writing. Rainforest Narratives is the perfect companion to her fiction for readers and scholars alike.' -- Publisher description.

Back to the Outback Pablo Armellino , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ob-Scene Spaces in Australian Narrative : An Account of the Socio-Topographic Construction of Space in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 245-265)
Literature in the Arid Zone Tom Lynch , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Littoral Zone : Australian Contexts and Their Writers 2007; (p. 70-92)
This chapter surveys and assesses from an ecocentric perspective some representative literary portrayals of the Australian deserts. Generally, it contrasts works that portray the desert as an alien, hostile, and undifferentiated void with works that recognise and value the biological particularities of specific desert places. It explores the literature of three dominant cultural orientations to the deserts: pastoralism, mining, and traversal. It concludes with a consideration of several multi-voiced and/or multi-genred bioregionally informed works that suggests fruitful directions for more ecocentric literary approaches. (abstract taken from The Littoral Zone)
Ideas of Order in Janette Turner Hospital's 'Oyster' Donald J. Greiner , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Critique : Studies in Contemporary Fiction , Summer vol. 48 no. 4 2007; (p. 381-390)
As an internationally renowned writer who has lived on four continents and who often feels what she describes as "dislocated," even in her native Australia, Janette Turner Hospital has long centered her novels and stories on characters who inhabit the margins of specific geographical locations. In her acclaimed novel Oyster (1996), however, she uses physical dislocation as a metaphor to explore the nature of narrative itself. Setting Oyster in the forbidding Australian Outback, Hospital contrasts the necessity of maps for people crossing the border to that huge expanse of desert and the unreliability of all maps. In Oyster, readers must become users of maps if they hope to negotiate the complexity of this nonlinear novel. Although maps, stories, and words themselves are no more than "poignant ideas of order," Hospital urges the reader to continue trying to know the story, even if no story (or novel such as Oyster) can be fully known.
The 'God Itch' : An Interview with Janette Turner Hospital Donald J. Greiner (interviewer), 2007 single work interview
— Appears in: Critique : Studies in Contemporary Fiction , Summer vol. 48 no. 4 2007; (p. 331-343)
Author Janette Turner Hospital discusses her work, including her motivation to write A Very Proper Death and her reason for using a pseudonym. She also comments on her [then] upcoming novel Orpheus Lost.
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Triangulating the Self : Turner Hospital, Hoffman and Sante Russell West-Pavlov , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transcultural Graffiti : Diasporic Writing and the Teaching of Literary Studies 2005; (p. 115-136)
The Many Circles of Hell: Dante's Legacy in Janette Turner Hospital's Literary Thrillers Tully Barnett , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Flinders Dante Conferences 2002 & 2004 2005; (p. 190-199)
Australia's Cultural Identity Now Janette Turner Hospital , 2005 single work essay
— Appears in: New Literatures Review , October no. 44 2005; (p. 5-13)
Among her reflections on Australian cultural identity, Janette Turner Hospital gives examples of two writers from non-Anglo-Celtic backgrounds and the difficulties they have faced in being accepted as 'Australian writers'.
'Just Enough Religion to Make Us Hate': The Case of Tourmaline and Oyster Richard Scott Carr , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 18 no. 1 2004; (p. 9-15)
Carr asserts that 'Stow and Hospital use fiction to explore the devestation wrought on a community whose long-suppressed spiritual desires find their outlet in the perverse and destructive.' He contends that 'the residents of Tourmaline and Outer Maroo, in refusing to address their alienation from their environment and themselves, ensure the disaster that closes both novels.'
Words of Water : Reading Otherness in Tourmaline and Oyster Bernadette Brennan , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 2004; (p. 143-157)
A Third Space? : Postcolonial Australia and the Fractal Landscape in The Last Magician and Oyster Fiona Coyle , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mapping the Sacred : Religion, Geography and Postcolonial Literatures 2001; (p. 111-130)
Rainforest Narratives: Janette Turner Hospital and the Ethics of Interference David Callahan , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 15 no. 1 2001; (p. 31-35)
(Be)longing in the Writing of Janette Turner Hospital : Eclipsing the Constitutive Force of Discourse Bronwyn Davies , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: (In)scribing Body/Landscape Relations 2000; (p. 233-247)
This Microcosm Is Her 'Oyster' Anne Steacy , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Books in Canada , December vol. 25 no. 9 1996; (p. 20-21)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Some Local Dantes Judith Armstrong , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 147 1997; (p. 83-85)

— Review of The Conversations at Curlow Creek David Malouf 1996 single work novel ; Highways to a War Christopher Koch 1995 single work novel ; Keep It Simple, Stupid Peter Goldsworthy 1996 single work novel ; The Island in the Mind Rodney Hall 1996 selected work novel ; The Drowner Robert Drewe 1996 single work novel ; Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
In the Back of the Outback Markman Ellis , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 13 September no. 4876 1996; (p. 22)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Apocalyptic Visions Burning Bright but Fading Too Soon Cassandra Pybus , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 22 September 1996; (p. 8)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Intrigue in the Australian Bush Graham Nowland , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 21 September 1996; (p. wkd 7)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Author Warns of Increase in Cults 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Mercury , 23 September 1996; (p. 26)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Lost in Outer Maroo David Matthews , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 28-29 September 1996; (p. rev 9)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Northern Disclosure Debra Adelaide , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 28 September 1996; (p. 10s)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Voyage to the Golden City Lucy Frost , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 28 September 1996; (p. 8)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Towards the Millennium: The Making of a Guru Colin Steele , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 5 October 1996; (p. C10)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Heavy Waters But No Pearls Robin Lucas , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 15 October vol. 116 no. 6042 1996; (p. 104-105)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Countdown to the Millennium Marion Halligan , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 185 1996; (p. 40-41)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Suspense Mechanism John Dale , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian's Review of Books , November vol. 1 no. 3 1996; (p. 5,26)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel ; The Cry of the Goldfinch Peter Skrzynecki 1996 single work novel
Oyster's a Black Pearl Patsy Crawford , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Mercury , 25 November 1996; (p. 37)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Roasted Peter Robb , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 6 March vol. 19 no. 5 1997; (p. 26)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Paperbacks Graham Clark , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 22 November 1997; (p. wkd 9)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel ; Tasting Salt Stephanie Dowrick 1997 single work novel
Untitled Carolyn Bliss , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: World Literature Today , Autumn vol. 71 no. 4 1997; (p. 861)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Way Outback Dale Peck , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 15 March 1998; (p. 11-12)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
Fiction : Probing the Psychology of Cults Donna Coates , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 12 no. 2 1998; (p. 116-117)

— Review of Oyster Janette Turner Hospital 1996 single work novel
'Just Enough Religion to Make Us Hate': The Case of Tourmaline and Oyster Richard Scott Carr , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 18 no. 1 2004; (p. 9-15)
Carr asserts that 'Stow and Hospital use fiction to explore the devestation wrought on a community whose long-suppressed spiritual desires find their outlet in the perverse and destructive.' He contends that 'the residents of Tourmaline and Outer Maroo, in refusing to address their alienation from their environment and themselves, ensure the disaster that closes both novels.'
Words of Water : Reading Otherness in Tourmaline and Oyster Bernadette Brennan , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 2004; (p. 143-157)
Triangulating the Self : Turner Hospital, Hoffman and Sante Russell West-Pavlov , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transcultural Graffiti : Diasporic Writing and the Teaching of Literary Studies 2005; (p. 115-136)
The Many Circles of Hell: Dante's Legacy in Janette Turner Hospital's Literary Thrillers Tully Barnett , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Flinders Dante Conferences 2002 & 2004 2005; (p. 190-199)
Literature in the Arid Zone Tom Lynch , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Littoral Zone : Australian Contexts and Their Writers 2007; (p. 70-92)
This chapter surveys and assesses from an ecocentric perspective some representative literary portrayals of the Australian deserts. Generally, it contrasts works that portray the desert as an alien, hostile, and undifferentiated void with works that recognise and value the biological particularities of specific desert places. It explores the literature of three dominant cultural orientations to the deserts: pastoralism, mining, and traversal. It concludes with a consideration of several multi-voiced and/or multi-genred bioregionally informed works that suggests fruitful directions for more ecocentric literary approaches. (abstract taken from The Littoral Zone)
Australia's Cultural Identity Now Janette Turner Hospital , 2005 single work essay
— Appears in: New Literatures Review , October no. 44 2005; (p. 5-13)
Among her reflections on Australian cultural identity, Janette Turner Hospital gives examples of two writers from non-Anglo-Celtic backgrounds and the difficulties they have faced in being accepted as 'Australian writers'.
y Rainforest Narratives : The Work of Janette Turner Hospital David Callahan , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2009 Z1611963 2009 single work criticism

'Rainforests evoke vivid imagery; the profusion of intertwined trees and undergrowth both invites and confounds exploration. Acclaimed writer Janette Turner Hospital conjures up a rainforest for readers by weaving threads of connection and meaning into a labyrinth of characters and plot lines. From The Ivory Swing to Orpheus Lost, Hospital's award-winning novels and short stories have challenged and intrigued readers for over twenty-five years. Hospital's books tackle complex themes of dislocation, identity, ethics and the nature of reality, wrapping around a reader like rainforest creepers, remaining attached long after the last page is turned.

In this groundbreaking work of literary criticism, David Callahan signposts and analyses the major themes scattered throughout Janette Turner Hospital's writing. Rainforest Narratives is the perfect companion to her fiction for readers and scholars alike.' -- Publisher description.

Untitled Wendy Cavenett (interviewer), 1997 single work interview
— Appears in: Between the Lines 1998;
Ideas of Order in Janette Turner Hospital's 'Oyster' Donald J. Greiner , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Critique : Studies in Contemporary Fiction , Summer vol. 48 no. 4 2007; (p. 381-390)
As an internationally renowned writer who has lived on four continents and who often feels what she describes as "dislocated," even in her native Australia, Janette Turner Hospital has long centered her novels and stories on characters who inhabit the margins of specific geographical locations. In her acclaimed novel Oyster (1996), however, she uses physical dislocation as a metaphor to explore the nature of narrative itself. Setting Oyster in the forbidding Australian Outback, Hospital contrasts the necessity of maps for people crossing the border to that huge expanse of desert and the unreliability of all maps. In Oyster, readers must become users of maps if they hope to negotiate the complexity of this nonlinear novel. Although maps, stories, and words themselves are no more than "poignant ideas of order," Hospital urges the reader to continue trying to know the story, even if no story (or novel such as Oyster) can be fully known.
The 'God Itch' : An Interview with Janette Turner Hospital Donald J. Greiner (interviewer), 2007 single work interview
— Appears in: Critique : Studies in Contemporary Fiction , Summer vol. 48 no. 4 2007; (p. 331-343)
Author Janette Turner Hospital discusses her work, including her motivation to write A Very Proper Death and her reason for using a pseudonym. She also comments on her [then] upcoming novel Orpheus Lost.
Seduction and Opal in the Outback Valmai Howe , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Globe and Mail , 26 October 1996; (p. 10)
(Be)longing in the Writing of Janette Turner Hospital : Eclipsing the Constitutive Force of Discourse Bronwyn Davies , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: (In)scribing Body/Landscape Relations 2000; (p. 233-247)
Back to the Outback Pablo Armellino , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ob-Scene Spaces in Australian Narrative : An Account of the Socio-Topographic Construction of Space in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 245-265)
Australian Infernos : Janette Turner Hospital's Translation of Dante's Hell into Contemporary Australia Mary McLaughlin , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cultural Transformations : Perspectives on Translocations in a Global Age 2010; (p. 51-72)
The Genesis of Oyster : Janette Turner Hospital's Outback Odyssey Janette Turner Hospital , 2010 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Found in Fryer : Stories from the Fryer Library Collection 2010; (p. 188-189)
Hospital discusses two trips to outback Queensland which were inspiration for her novel Oyster.
‘Thick with Coded Testaments’ : Representations of Postcolonial Space in Janette Turner Hospital’s Oyster Nicholas Dunlop , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 75-92)
Interview with Janet Turner Hospital Cheryl Jorgensen (interviewer), 2010 single work interview
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 36 no. 1 & 2 2010; (p. 186-187)
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Inside Out in the Land Down Under : Reading Trauma through Janette Turner Hospital's Oyster Isabel Fraile , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Splintered Glass : Facets of Trauma in the Post-Colony and Beyond 2011; (p. 221-243)
Isabel Fraile claims that 'While a thoroughly enjoyable and gripping experience, reading Janette Turner Hospital's Oyster (1996) often manages to feel, at the same time, like reading a handbook of trauma theory.' (p 221)
Due Preparations for Paradise : or, The Plague Now According to Hany Abu-Assad and Janette Turner Hospital Helga Ramsey-Kurz , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Engaging with Literature of Commitment : The Worldly Scholar (Volume 2) 2012; (p. 217-230)
Last amended 11 Sep 2006 11:35:54
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