Goin' single work   poetry   "Ain't I got no hope, Nurse? Garn, tell a feller straight!"
Issue Details: First known date: 1917 1917
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y The Bulletin vol. 38 no. 1953 19 July 1917 Z622696 1917 periodical issue 1917 pg. 14
  • Appears in:
    y Kenneth Slessor : Collected Poems Kenneth Slessor , Dennis Haskell (editor), Geoffrey Dutton (editor), Pymble : Angus and Robertson , 1994 Z396988 1994 collected work poetry drama Comprehensive collection of Slessor's work from earlier selections as well as previously uncollected work, with preface, chronology and extensive textual and explanatory notes. Pymble : Angus and Robertson , 1994 pg. 251

Works about this Work

Kenneth Slessor's 'Other Front' Julian Croft , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: ‘Whaddaya Know?’ : Writings for Syd Harrex 2015; (p. 43-52)
'Kenneth Slessor's first published poem at the age of 16 was in the Bulletin (Goin'', 19 July 1917) and was a tribute to a dying Australian soldier after the Anzac landings. For the sixteen year-old, no doubt reflecting C.E.W. Bean's influence, the individual death and the wider military defeat are redeemed by the prospect of joining his mates in death and glory on another front, and as he leaves this world the soldier imagines the [sic] he hears the surf at Manly and the sights of Sydney Harbour. Slessor finished school as the Armistice was signed, but not before publishing two more poems on the war -'France' 1918' and 'Jerusalem Set Free' - both celebrating the Anzac tradition and seeing purpose and sense in those years of awful conflict.' (43)
`The Nothing... Neither Long Nor Short' : Attitudes to Death in the Work of Kenneth Slessor Dennis Haskell , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reconnoitres : Essays in Australian Literature in Honour of G. A. Wilkes 1992; (p. 115-127)
`The Nothing... Neither Long Nor Short' : Attitudes to Death in the Work of Kenneth Slessor Dennis Haskell , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reconnoitres : Essays in Australian Literature in Honour of G. A. Wilkes 1992; (p. 115-127)
Kenneth Slessor's 'Other Front' Julian Croft , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: ‘Whaddaya Know?’ : Writings for Syd Harrex 2015; (p. 43-52)
'Kenneth Slessor's first published poem at the age of 16 was in the Bulletin (Goin'', 19 July 1917) and was a tribute to a dying Australian soldier after the Anzac landings. For the sixteen year-old, no doubt reflecting C.E.W. Bean's influence, the individual death and the wider military defeat are redeemed by the prospect of joining his mates in death and glory on another front, and as he leaves this world the soldier imagines the [sic] he hears the surf at Manly and the sights of Sydney Harbour. Slessor finished school as the Armistice was signed, but not before publishing two more poems on the war -'France' 1918' and 'Jerusalem Set Free' - both celebrating the Anzac tradition and seeing purpose and sense in those years of awful conflict.' (43)
Last amended 21 Jan 2014 18:19:00
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