Dick Roughsey i(25 works by) (a.k.a. Goobalathaldin Roughsey)
Also writes as: Goobalathaldin
Born: Established: 1924 Langunarnji Island, Gulf of Carpentaria area, Far North Queensland, Queensland, ; Died: Ceased: 20 Oct 1985 Mornington Island, Gulf of Carpentaria area, Far North Queensland, Queensland,
Gender: Male
Heritage: Aboriginal Lardil people ; Aboriginal
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BiographyHistory

Dick Roughsey was born near Mornington Island in the Gulf of Carpentaria in 1924. His name is translated from his tribal name Goobalathaldin, meaning 'water standing on end' or 'Rough sea'. He received a traditional upbringing in the bush until the age of eight, when he was educated at a Presyterian mission school. After completing primary school he returned to tribal life. At the age of sixteen he went to the Australian mainland, to work as a stockman on cattle stations in North Queensland and as a deckhand on ships near Cairns.

He began to paint using traditional methods with bark. In 1962 he met former Ansett pilot, Percy Trezise, who became his mentor and encouraged him to also use Western methods of painting in oils. Roughsey held successful exhibitions of his work in many Australian cities. He and Trezise collaborated for many years, producing picture books which retold traditional stories. These were among the first to introduce Aboriginal culture to children. Roughsey also illustrated The Turkey and the Emu (1978), a traditional tale retold by his wife, Elsie Roughsey

Roughsey lived with his wife and their six children on Mornington Island, but usually spent half of each year on the North Queensland mainland. With Percy Trezise he discovered and studied the art in Aboriginal cave galleries in the Laura region of Cape York. One of these was the Quinkin gallery, which inspired the award-winning books The Quinkins and Turramulli the Giant Quinkin.

He was the first chairman of the Aboriginal Arts Board of the Australia Council in 1973.

Awards for Works

Turramulli the Giant Quinkin 1982 single work picture book children's Indigenous story Two children of the Yalanji people are pursued by Turramulli, the largest and fiercest of the spirits roaming the bushland.
1983 commended Children's Book Council Book of the Year Awards Picture Book of the Year
Turramulli the Giant Quinkin 1982 single work picture book children's Indigenous story Two children of the Yalanji people are pursued by Turramulli, the largest and fiercest of the spirits roaming the bushland.
1983 commended Children's Book Council Book of the Year Awards Picture Book of the Year
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