Francesca Rendle-Short i(63 works by)
Born: Established: 1960 Sheffield, South Yorkshire,
United Kingdom (UK),
Western Europe, Europe,
Gender: Female
Arrived in Australia: 1961
Heritage: British
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Francesca Rendle-Short migrated to Australia with her family at the age of one year, the fifth of sixth children. The family settled in Brisbane. Rendle-Short studied at the University of New England before moving to Adelaide and later to Canberra. She has worked in radio, education and publishing. Her novella, Big Sister, was published in 1989 by Redress Press, and her short stories have been published in various literary journals. Her creative non-fiction has also been published in a number of journals.

Rendle-Short was a member of the ACT Cultural Council, Chair of the Literature Peer Committee and ACT Book of the Year from 2002-2006. She has been a lecturer in the Creative Writing program at the University of Canberra, and was awarded the Vice-Chancellor's Distinction Award for Teaching and Learning in February 2005.

Rendle-Short was appointed to manage a new undergraduate creative writing course at RMIT, Melbourne, Victoria, from January 2009.

Personal Awards

Awards for Works

Bite Your Tongue Bite Your Tongue , 2008 single work novel 'Mrs Angel Rendle-Short said that a book given to her daughter, Francesca, as an English textbook at school would teach her to be a permissive rebel.' - Courier Mail, 1975.

'There are some things you should never speak about.

' In Francesca Rendle-Short's family, silence was golden. So to break ranks and tell stories about her peculiar family life and her mother's moral crusading should send this daughter straight to hell in a ball of smoke and flame along with all those books her mother wanted to burn.

'Set in 1970s Queensland and also contemporary times, Bite Your Tongue is an elegant mix of novel and memoir that is in turn harrowing and delightful. Can a daughter forgive her mother for making her a pawn in her conservative moral crusades? Can greater understanding reinstate love? What does a mother owe a daughter and a daughter a mother?

'Bite Your Tongue is the story of the deep bond that exists between a daughter and her mother, no matter how difficult that mother might be. It is also a story of acceptance.' (From the publisher's website.)
2011 shortlisted Colin Roderick Award
Imago 1996 single work novel
1997 joint winner Australian Capital Territory Book of the Year Award
Last amended 16 Dec 2008
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