Play School single work   companion entry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2014... 2014 Play School
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Notes

  • PLAY SCHOOL

    Based on the BBC’s Playschool, Play School first aired on ABC Television on 18 July 1966. It is Australia’s longest-running continuously produced children’s show, with 80 per cent of preschool children watching at least once a week.

    Play School has an educational approach, based on research into the conceptual development of pre-school children. The program aims to encourage children to wonder, to think, to feel and to imagine, encouraging participation. The show’s presenters seek to engage each child directly and personally, using stories, songs and activities reflecting the culture of Australian children.

    Many well-known Australian actors and television presenters have worked as presenters, including Lorraine Bayly, John Hamblin, Simon Burke, Noni Hazlehurst, Georgie Parker and John Waters. Play School also features familiar toys—including Big Ted and Jemima. Regular segments include book readings, telling the time and moving through different-shaped windows to video clips of the world outside.

    Throughout its life, the program has maintained its basic approach while revising its ‘look’ as television presentation developed. The show had a major revamp in 2000; another update occurred in 2011, with a new arrangement of its theme song sung by presenters Jay Laga’aia and Justine Clarke.

    Play School spawned the Bananas in Pajamas, after the Bananas’ theme song became popular on the show. It also featured an early performance by The Wiggles. The program attracted controversy in 2004 when a segment showing a child with ‘two mums’ was aired.

    Play School was admitted to the Logies Hall of Fame in 2006.

    REF: Play School producers’ notes (held by author).

    HARVEY BROADBENT

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Television Format Traffic-public Service Style Albert Moran , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 29 no. 5 2015; (p. 684-693)

'Beginning in 1998, there has been an explosion in the flow of television programme formats worldwide witnessing to the advent of a global television system for programme production and distribution. In fact, this kind of programme adaptation and remaking had a long gestation that reaches back even before the beginnings of regular television broadcasting to the early 1940s. Media scholars were very slow over the subsequent half-century to register what was taking place, let alone inquire into its dynamics and critical significance. If programme remaking was noticed at all, it was understood in high culture terms as confirmation of crassness and materialism operating in commercial television. Critical research added a further charge of media imperialism to describe the supposed national and social outcomes of such a practice. However, since the 1990s, scholarly inquiry has affected a seachange in its engagement with the phenomenon of television programme remaking that was prompted not least by a realisation that its commercial and cultural operations and consequences are more interesting, intriguing, and multi-dimensional than was earlier thought. In this context, three programme format transfers that happened between the UK and Australia in the 1960s are examined. The three sets of programme transfer constitute a rich, engaging area of analysis for several reasons including the fact that they were ‘live’ programme formats whereas their exchange took place in a public service context, the latter being a sector that usually falls under the critical radar. Drawing connections of this kind across an imperial cultural space can make a significant contribution to transnational television history from a comparative Anglophone perspective.' (Publication abstract)

Television Format Traffic-public Service Style Albert Moran , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 29 no. 5 2015; (p. 684-693)

'Beginning in 1998, there has been an explosion in the flow of television programme formats worldwide witnessing to the advent of a global television system for programme production and distribution. In fact, this kind of programme adaptation and remaking had a long gestation that reaches back even before the beginnings of regular television broadcasting to the early 1940s. Media scholars were very slow over the subsequent half-century to register what was taking place, let alone inquire into its dynamics and critical significance. If programme remaking was noticed at all, it was understood in high culture terms as confirmation of crassness and materialism operating in commercial television. Critical research added a further charge of media imperialism to describe the supposed national and social outcomes of such a practice. However, since the 1990s, scholarly inquiry has affected a seachange in its engagement with the phenomenon of television programme remaking that was prompted not least by a realisation that its commercial and cultural operations and consequences are more interesting, intriguing, and multi-dimensional than was earlier thought. In this context, three programme format transfers that happened between the UK and Australia in the 1960s are examined. The three sets of programme transfer constitute a rich, engaging area of analysis for several reasons including the fact that they were ‘live’ programme formats whereas their exchange took place in a public service context, the latter being a sector that usually falls under the critical radar. Drawing connections of this kind across an imperial cultural space can make a significant contribution to transnational television history from a comparative Anglophone perspective.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 28 Nov 2016 17:37:28
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