2310173678585170248.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Dance of the Freaky Green Gold single work   novel   young adult  
Issue Details: First known date: 2008 2008
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Dance of the freaky green gold is the Silver winner in the Sanlam Prize for Youth Literature 2007. Rick and his family have to move in with Uncle Bert, an eccentric shift engineer at Ashby power station. Uncle Bert is very secretive about his latest scheme, but Rick just knows it has something to do with the people experimenting with tubes of green goo at the dam. Rick and his new friend Sipho decide to investigate further. ' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Cape Town,
      c
      South Africa,
      c
      Southern Africa, Africa,
      :
      Tafelberg-Uitgewers , 2008 .
      2310173678585170248.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 106p.
      Note/s:
      • Published August 1st 2008
      ISBN: 9780624046714

Works about this Work

How Do We Define the Climate Change Novel? Deborah Jordan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Climate Change Narratives in Australian Fiction 2014; (p. 33-40)
'How do we best define a climate change novel? Given the complexities of climate change, as a real, scientific and cultural phenomenon, global warming demands a corresponding degree of complexity in fictional representation. Recent popular debates here and overseas raise further questions about what exactly constitutes a climate change novel. Does a climate change novel need to be set in the present? Or set in the future? Set during the time of climate change and extreme weather events, and the associated food scarcity and water wars, or can it be well after that —such as George Turner’s iconic The Sea and Summer? Are these novels best framed in context of utopian studies and science fiction studies? Andrew Milner has contextualised The Sea and Summer in terms of understanding the history of Australian science-fictional dystopias. For him, science fiction, whether utopian or dystopian , is ‘as good a place as any’ for ‘thought experiments about the politics of climate change’. He rejects the widespread ‘academic prejudice in literary studies against science fiction dystopias’ arguing that science fiction cannot readily be assimilated into either high literature or popular fiction (as genre). ' (33)
How Do We Define the Climate Change Novel? Deborah Jordan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Climate Change Narratives in Australian Fiction 2014; (p. 33-40)
'How do we best define a climate change novel? Given the complexities of climate change, as a real, scientific and cultural phenomenon, global warming demands a corresponding degree of complexity in fictional representation. Recent popular debates here and overseas raise further questions about what exactly constitutes a climate change novel. Does a climate change novel need to be set in the present? Or set in the future? Set during the time of climate change and extreme weather events, and the associated food scarcity and water wars, or can it be well after that —such as George Turner’s iconic The Sea and Summer? Are these novels best framed in context of utopian studies and science fiction studies? Andrew Milner has contextualised The Sea and Summer in terms of understanding the history of Australian science-fictional dystopias. For him, science fiction, whether utopian or dystopian , is ‘as good a place as any’ for ‘thought experiments about the politics of climate change’. He rejects the widespread ‘academic prejudice in literary studies against science fiction dystopias’ arguing that science fiction cannot readily be assimilated into either high literature or popular fiction (as genre). ' (33)
Last amended 4 Feb 2016 10:16:38
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