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Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 It's Our Country Too : Indigenous Arguments for Meaningful Constitutional Recognition and Reform
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A collection of short essays by leading and emerging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander thinkers and leaders. Edited by and including contributions from Megan Davis and Marcia Langton, it conveys to Australians why indigenous peoples should have a direct say in the decisions that affect their lives. Australia is one of the only liberal democracies still grappling with fundamental questions about the place of indigenous peoples, unlike its common law cousins Canada, the United States and New Zealand. (Source: Publisher's website)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Carlton, Parkville - Carlton area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Melbourne University Press , 2016 .
      407230470499432842.jpg
      This image has been sourced from MUP Books with Spine website
      Note/s:
      • First published 28 March 2016
      ISBN: 9780522869941, 9780522869934

Works about this Work

Recognise What Governments Have Not Nigel Parbury , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 16 July 2016; (p. 22)

— Review of It's Our Country Too : Indigenous Arguments for Meaningful Constitutional Recognition and Reform 2016 anthology essay
'It’s Our Country contains essays by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander legal specialists, academics and business and community leaders. Each sets out their view on meaningful constitutional recognition, and “their visions for reform”. The book is edited by Megan Davis, director of the University of NSW law school, and Marcia Langton, foundation chair of Australian indigenous studies at the University of Melbourne. It’s closely argued, well written and often graphic (“the airtight cage of poverty”), as befits “polities” (nations) of poetic storytellers. ...'
Reaching Out : Two Unique Contribution to a Complex Debate Kevin Bell , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 386 2016; (p. 16-17)
'Are you part of the non-Indigenous majority? Have you had too little contact with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people? Do you feel that you do not fully comprehend their worldview, but wish you could? Is entrenched Aboriginal disadvantage eating away at your sense of Australia as a fair and united country? Do you still possess the recollection of your first encounter with an Aboriginal person, and wonder why it remains so enduring? Are you troubled by the time being taken to achieve constitutional recognition and frustrated that an apparently simple issue has become so vexed? If these questions resonate in your mind, you have much in common with many Australians and may benefit from reading these books.' (Introduction)
Recognise What Governments Have Not Nigel Parbury , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 16 July 2016; (p. 22)

— Review of It's Our Country Too : Indigenous Arguments for Meaningful Constitutional Recognition and Reform 2016 anthology essay
'It’s Our Country contains essays by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander legal specialists, academics and business and community leaders. Each sets out their view on meaningful constitutional recognition, and “their visions for reform”. The book is edited by Megan Davis, director of the University of NSW law school, and Marcia Langton, foundation chair of Australian indigenous studies at the University of Melbourne. It’s closely argued, well written and often graphic (“the airtight cage of poverty”), as befits “polities” (nations) of poetic storytellers. ...'
Reaching Out : Two Unique Contribution to a Complex Debate Kevin Bell , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 386 2016; (p. 16-17)
'Are you part of the non-Indigenous majority? Have you had too little contact with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people? Do you feel that you do not fully comprehend their worldview, but wish you could? Is entrenched Aboriginal disadvantage eating away at your sense of Australia as a fair and united country? Do you still possess the recollection of your first encounter with an Aboriginal person, and wonder why it remains so enduring? Are you troubled by the time being taken to achieve constitutional recognition and frustrated that an apparently simple issue has become so vexed? If these questions resonate in your mind, you have much in common with many Australians and may benefit from reading these books.' (Introduction)
Last amended 18 Jul 2016 11:12:55
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