y Archway Motif single work   drama  
Issue Details: First known date: 1935 1935
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The final play to be staged by Adelaide experimental theatre company Ab-Intra, Archway Motif was inspired by the the white ballroom at St Corantyn, where the worked was eventually produced. In Dreamers and Visionaries ( ) Thelma Afford recalls:

[Baruch] perceived that the arch had two opposing sides in conflict - 'good and evil, wisdom and folly, etc'. Yet he saw further that 'an Archway is something more than two sides in opposition. It is something of still splendour and posied majesty.' It was with the fuller application of this theme that the play mainly deals. Even in this last production, Baruch made no concession to his audience: 'Half the audience was frankly puzzled as to the meaning of it all, and the other half looked desperately anxious to appear au fait with something they couldn't grasp' (p.71).

The characters included the Old Player (representing the Wisdom of the Ages), Kay (the youthful president of any student movement), Gerda (representing everybody's lost love), The Girl (who 'blazened across each man's path, once like a blazing star'), the Old Gentleman (puzzled and irritated by the youth of the day), and an [unnamed] leader of a conspiracy.

Notes

  • Thelma Afford further notes that this final production brought together almost everybody who had ever helped Ab-Intra.
  • The curtain-raiser for the 1935 St Corantyn season was The Curious Herbal, a rhyming fantasy of old Chelsea days from the repertoirs of the Green Leaf Players.

    The season was initially planned for two nights (1-2 March). A third performance was added due to the enthusiastic response of the public.

  • One of the parts in the 1935 Adelaide production was undertaken by the theatrical donkey which had played the role of 'Hepzibah' in The Road to Bethlehem, and which 'Lady Kitty' records 'raised many smiles in the studio' ('Round the Bridge Table,' p.19).

Production Details

  • 1935: White ballroom, St Corantyn, Adelaide; 1-3 March

    • Directors Kester Baruch and Alan Harkness; Producer Ab-Intra Studio Theatre; Stage Managers Lance Brown and Joan Kinmont.
    • Cast incl. Alan Harkness (Old Player), Kester Baruch (Kay), Agnes Dobson (Gerda), Thema Thomas (the Girl), David Dawson (Old Gentleman), Frank Bailey (leader of the conspiracy), John Morgan, Mildred Field, Janet Cleland, Joanna Seith, Shirley Stevens, Marjorie Francis, Ruby Skinner, Lucy Willoughby, Ada Stephens, W. Kennedy, H. Tideman and Max Afford.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

      1935 .
      Extent: 17 l.p.
      (Manuscript) assertion

      Holdings

      Held at: University of Queensland University of Queensland Library Fryer Library
      Location: The Hanger Collection of Australian Playscripts
      Local Id: H0123

Works about this Work

y Dreamers and Visionaries : Adelaide's Little Theatres From the 1920s to the early 1940s Thelma Afford , Kerrie Round (editor), Sydney : Currency Press , 2004 Z1451581 2004 single work criticism 'Between the 1920s and 1940s there was a diverse flowering of amateur theatres in Adelaide which were experimental, inventive and ahead of their time, anticipating later theatre movements. Dreamers and Visionaries explores the rise and fall of these little theatres, reviewing their performances and personalities, and celebrating their outstanding legacy of experimentation. Afford shows how such groups greatly enhanced the South Australian theatre scene, forming the basis of Adelaide's reputation as 'the city of culture' and helping to contribute to the development of the Adelaide Festival of Arts.' (Publisher's blurb)
Farewell Performance at St. Corantyn 1935 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 2 March 1935; (p. 19)

— Review of Archway Motif Kester Baruch 1935 single work drama

Review of the opening night performance of the 1935 Adelaide production of Archway Motif (White Ballroom, St. Corantyn, Adelaide; 1 March).

Round the Bridge Table : Interesting Play 'Lady Kitty' , 1935 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 22 February 1935; (p. 15)

— Review of Archway Motif Kester Baruch 1935 single work drama

A preview of the forthcoming Ab-Intra farewell production, Archway Motif (White Ballroom, St. Coranyn, Adelaide; 1-3 March 1935).

Ab Intra Players Successful : Production of Two Plays 1935 single work
— Appears in: The News [Adelaide] , 2 March 1935; (p. 5)

— Review of Archway Motif Kester Baruch 1935 single work drama

Review of the opening night performance of the 1935 Adelaide production of Archway Motif (White Ballroom, St. Corantyn, Adelaide; 1 March).

Farewell Performance at St. Corantyn 1935 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 2 March 1935; (p. 19)

— Review of Archway Motif Kester Baruch 1935 single work drama

Review of the opening night performance of the 1935 Adelaide production of Archway Motif (White Ballroom, St. Corantyn, Adelaide; 1 March).

Round the Bridge Table : Interesting Play 'Lady Kitty' , 1935 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 22 February 1935; (p. 15)

— Review of Archway Motif Kester Baruch 1935 single work drama

A preview of the forthcoming Ab-Intra farewell production, Archway Motif (White Ballroom, St. Coranyn, Adelaide; 1-3 March 1935).

Ab Intra Players Successful : Production of Two Plays 1935 single work
— Appears in: The News [Adelaide] , 2 March 1935; (p. 5)

— Review of Archway Motif Kester Baruch 1935 single work drama

Review of the opening night performance of the 1935 Adelaide production of Archway Motif (White Ballroom, St. Corantyn, Adelaide; 1 March).

y Dreamers and Visionaries : Adelaide's Little Theatres From the 1920s to the early 1940s Thelma Afford , Kerrie Round (editor), Sydney : Currency Press , 2004 Z1451581 2004 single work criticism 'Between the 1920s and 1940s there was a diverse flowering of amateur theatres in Adelaide which were experimental, inventive and ahead of their time, anticipating later theatre movements. Dreamers and Visionaries explores the rise and fall of these little theatres, reviewing their performances and personalities, and celebrating their outstanding legacy of experimentation. Afford shows how such groups greatly enhanced the South Australian theatre scene, forming the basis of Adelaide's reputation as 'the city of culture' and helping to contribute to the development of the Adelaide Festival of Arts.' (Publisher's blurb)
Last amended 15 Sep 2016 11:00:49
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