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y George Dyunjgayan's Bulu Line : A West Kimberley Song Cycle selected work   poetry   criticism  
Note: Transcription and gloss by Ray Keogh with Paddy Roe and Butcher Joe Nangan.
Issue Details: First known date: 2014 2014
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Bulu Line is a pioneering experiment in contemporary Australian literature, it is a translation of a richly textured oral poetry into print form. The seventeen verses of 'The Bulu Line are full of magic and local history, the poems describe journeys with ancestors and spirit beings, encounters with rainbow serpents and ferocious storms, and explore the vast distances of the West Kimberley landscape.' (Source: Backcover)

Notes

  • The Poem/Song Cycle is in Two Parts:

    Bulu Part One contains: verse 1 to Verse 8

    Bulu Part Two contains: verse 9 to verse 17

Contents

* Contents derived from the Glebe, Glebe - Leichhardt - Balmain area, Sydney Inner West, Sydney, New South Wales,: Puncher and Wattmann , 2014 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Bulu: Part Onei"wanydyalmirri yinjanydyina", George Dyunjgayan , 2014 single work poetry (p. 43-60)
Bulu : Part Twoi"larndyimirri yinjanydyina", George Dyunjgayan , 2014 single work poetry (p. 61-79)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Phillip Hall Reviews George Dyungayan’s Bulu Line: A West Kimberley Song Cycle by Stuart Cooke and Eelahroo (Long Ago) Nyah (Looking) Mobo-Mobo (Future) by Lionel Fogarty Phillip Hall , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , February 2016;

— Review of George Dyunjgayan's Bulu Line : A West Kimberley Song Cycle Stuart Cooke (translator), 2014 selected work poetry criticism ; Eelahroo (Long Ago) Nyah (Looking) Möbö-Möbö (Future) Lionel Fogarty 2014 selected work poetry poetry

'In a more perfect world (where there are fewer crippling complications) Stuart Cooke’s multi layered and lyrical verse translation of a Traditional Song Cycle would probably be what most of us would like First Nations literature to look like. It is a richly collaborative project bringing together the creative energies of Traditional Owners and a non-Indigenous academic and poet. Cooke’s book is a proud celebration of Nyigina Culture and Language and makes an invaluable contribution to Cultural maintenance. ...'

Australian Poetry Now Bronwyn Lea , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Poetry , May 2016; (p. 185-191)
'Once asked what poets can do for Australia, A.D. Hope replied: “They can justify its existence.” Such has been the charge of Australian poets, from Hope himself to Kenneth Slessor, Judith Wright to Les Murray, Anthony Lawrence to Judith Beveridge: to articulate the Australian experience so that it might live in the imagination of its people. While the presence and potency of the Australian landscape remains an abiding interest, a great deal of Australian poetry has been innovative and experimental, with poets such as Robert Adamson, Michael Dransfield, Vicki Viidikas, John Forbes, Gig Ryan,   J.S. Harry, and Jennifer Maiden leading the way. The richness, strength, and vitality of Australian poetry is marked by a prodigious diversity that makes it as exhilarating to survey as it is challenging to encapsulate.' (Introduction)
The Raw and the Cooke R. D. Wood , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 5 no. 2 2015; (p. 66-78)
'Stuart Cooke is a well-travelled poet. Although he now resides in Brisbane, where he is a lecturer in creative writing at Griffith University, he draws upon the Kimberley and Chile in his writing. From this experience, his project as a poet, critic and editor could be said to be one of decentring Australian poetics, of taking it away from its power bases in Sydney and Melbourne and situating it in far less familiar spaces. In this essay, I will focus on three of his works: Departure Into Cloud, Bulu Line and Speaking the Earth's Languages. While my essay in in three distinct parts, corresponding to the three books, I return to certain themes and questions throughout. In considering Cooke's works together, I want to acknowledge his important contribution to poetry in Australia. But his works are simply a starting point, a place of departure, towards a different ecosystem than what we currently have.' (Introduction 67)
Australian Aboriginal Songpoetry R. D. Wood , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Jacket2 , 2015 2015;

'A history of Australian Aboriginal songpoetry in English is a shadow project. Of course it exists as a thing in and of itself. But in translation, as it so often is, songpoetry can be considered symptomatic of an Anglophone poetry project. This is not to suggest there is no exchange between the country of the songs and the poetry context into which they are translated. It is surely a work of collaboration. However, what we do see when we read songpoetry in translation are the changes in Australian poetry itself — there is, for example, strict meter, rhyme, and line in the early nineteenth century, wholly replaced by freer forms of expression 150 years later. The most recent example of Aboriginal songpoetry in mainstream literary publishing is Stuart Cooke’s George Dyungayan’s Bulu Line: A West Kimberly Song Cycle (Puncher and Wattman 2014). Cooke uses changes in font, loose rhyme, minor repetition, and a free, fragmentary approach comprising short lines that recalls some classical Greek and Chinese texts as they are currently presented in the transnational Anglophonic world. In other words, this rendering by Cooke relies on a whole series of poetic choices that are themselves indicators of what is happening in poetry now not just songpoetry in its home location.' (Introduction)

Phillip Hall Reviews George Dyungayan’s Bulu Line: A West Kimberley Song Cycle by Stuart Cooke and Eelahroo (Long Ago) Nyah (Looking) Mobo-Mobo (Future) by Lionel Fogarty Phillip Hall , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , February 2016;

— Review of George Dyunjgayan's Bulu Line : A West Kimberley Song Cycle Stuart Cooke (translator), 2014 selected work poetry criticism ; Eelahroo (Long Ago) Nyah (Looking) Möbö-Möbö (Future) Lionel Fogarty 2014 selected work poetry poetry

'In a more perfect world (where there are fewer crippling complications) Stuart Cooke’s multi layered and lyrical verse translation of a Traditional Song Cycle would probably be what most of us would like First Nations literature to look like. It is a richly collaborative project bringing together the creative energies of Traditional Owners and a non-Indigenous academic and poet. Cooke’s book is a proud celebration of Nyigina Culture and Language and makes an invaluable contribution to Cultural maintenance. ...'

The Raw and the Cooke R. D. Wood , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 5 no. 2 2015; (p. 66-78)
'Stuart Cooke is a well-travelled poet. Although he now resides in Brisbane, where he is a lecturer in creative writing at Griffith University, he draws upon the Kimberley and Chile in his writing. From this experience, his project as a poet, critic and editor could be said to be one of decentring Australian poetics, of taking it away from its power bases in Sydney and Melbourne and situating it in far less familiar spaces. In this essay, I will focus on three of his works: Departure Into Cloud, Bulu Line and Speaking the Earth's Languages. While my essay in in three distinct parts, corresponding to the three books, I return to certain themes and questions throughout. In considering Cooke's works together, I want to acknowledge his important contribution to poetry in Australia. But his works are simply a starting point, a place of departure, towards a different ecosystem than what we currently have.' (Introduction 67)
Australian Poetry Now Bronwyn Lea , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Poetry , May 2016; (p. 185-191)
'Once asked what poets can do for Australia, A.D. Hope replied: “They can justify its existence.” Such has been the charge of Australian poets, from Hope himself to Kenneth Slessor, Judith Wright to Les Murray, Anthony Lawrence to Judith Beveridge: to articulate the Australian experience so that it might live in the imagination of its people. While the presence and potency of the Australian landscape remains an abiding interest, a great deal of Australian poetry has been innovative and experimental, with poets such as Robert Adamson, Michael Dransfield, Vicki Viidikas, John Forbes, Gig Ryan,   J.S. Harry, and Jennifer Maiden leading the way. The richness, strength, and vitality of Australian poetry is marked by a prodigious diversity that makes it as exhilarating to survey as it is challenging to encapsulate.' (Introduction)
Australian Aboriginal Songpoetry R. D. Wood , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Jacket2 , 2015 2015;

'A history of Australian Aboriginal songpoetry in English is a shadow project. Of course it exists as a thing in and of itself. But in translation, as it so often is, songpoetry can be considered symptomatic of an Anglophone poetry project. This is not to suggest there is no exchange between the country of the songs and the poetry context into which they are translated. It is surely a work of collaboration. However, what we do see when we read songpoetry in translation are the changes in Australian poetry itself — there is, for example, strict meter, rhyme, and line in the early nineteenth century, wholly replaced by freer forms of expression 150 years later. The most recent example of Aboriginal songpoetry in mainstream literary publishing is Stuart Cooke’s George Dyungayan’s Bulu Line: A West Kimberly Song Cycle (Puncher and Wattman 2014). Cooke uses changes in font, loose rhyme, minor repetition, and a free, fragmentary approach comprising short lines that recalls some classical Greek and Chinese texts as they are currently presented in the transnational Anglophonic world. In other words, this rendering by Cooke relies on a whole series of poetic choices that are themselves indicators of what is happening in poetry now not just songpoetry in its home location.' (Introduction)

Last amended 7 Jul 2016 14:02:30
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