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This image has been sourced from online.
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This image has been sourced from online.
y The Lives of Animals selected work   essay  
Note: edited and introduced by Amy Gutmann
Issue Details: First known date: 1999 1999
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The idea of human cruelty to animals so consumes novelist Elizabeth Costello in her later years that she can no longer look another person in the eye: humans, especially meat-eating ones, seem to her to be conspirators in a crime of stupefying magnitude taking place on farms and in slaughterhouses, factories, and laboratories across the world. Here the internationally renowned writer J.M. Coetzee uses fiction to present a powerfully moving discussion of animal rights in all their complexity. He draws us into Elizabeth Costello's own sense of mortality, her compassion for animals, and her alienation from humans, even from her own family. In his fable, presented as a Tanner Lecture sponsored by the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University, Coetzee immerses us in a drama reflecting the real-life situation at hand: a writer delivering a lecture on an emotionally charged issue at a prestigious university. ' (Publication summary)

Adaptations

form y The Lives of Animals Tanika Gupta , United Kingdom (UK) : British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) , 2002 8035810 2002 single work film/TV

'Based on the writings of Booker Prize winner JM Coetzee, this powerful dramatisation is directed by Alexander Harvey. It follows Elizabeth Costello , to whom the idea of human cruelty to animals is so abhorrent that she can no longer look another person in the eye. Her compassion leads her to believe that humans - and especially meat-eaters - are conspiring in a crime on an appalling scale.'

Source:

[Television guide], Radio Times, 18 July 2002, p.103.

Notes

  • Wikipedia entry : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lives_of_Animals

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Princeton, New Jersey,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Princeton University Press , 1999 .
      1541341053916996636.gif
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 127p.
      Edition info: 1st ed.
      Reprinted: 2001 , 2003
      ISBN: 069107089X (pbk.), 9780691070896 (pbk.), 0691004439 (hbk.), 9780691004433 (hbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Profile Books , 1999 .
      7112822002374635210.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 125p.
      Reprinted: 2001
      ISBN: 186197258X, 9781861972583
    • South Yarra, South Yarra - Glen Iris area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Hardie Grant Books , 2000 .
      ISBN: 1876719516, 9781876719517
Alternative title: As vidas dos animais
Language: Portuguese
    • Lisbon,
      c
      Portugal,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Temas e Debates , 2000 .
      8225446987685070892.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 134p.
      Edition info: 1st ed.
      Reprinted: 2003
      ISBN: 9727592236, 9789727592234

Works about this Work

y Sympathy for the Animal(ized) Other in Selected Works of J. M. Coetzee On Yue Joyce Chan , Hong Kong : 2015 8424922 2015 single work thesis

'Sympathy, understood to be the capacity to suffer with the other, has long been regarded as one of the major vehicles to inspire an ethical communion. By minimizing differences through identification, sympathy helps us resonate with other beings and to exist in relation to them. This thesis examines the ethical endeavors on the vexed question of sympathy in four works by J. M. Coetzee - - The Lives of Animals (1999), Disgrace (1999), Elizabeth Costello (2003) and Slow Man (2005), all of which manifest Coetzee's notable interest in a fully-engaged sympathetic imagination into depraved and deprived human or nonhuman subjects. ' (Thesis summary)

What Does It Mean to Teach The Lives of Animals or Disgrace? Michael Bell , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 43-48)
Pedagogies of Discomfort : Teaching Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals Wendy Woodward , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 139-145)
Teaching Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals in the First-Year Composition Classroom Sharon Payne , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 174-179)
To Live : Exploring the Meshwork of Being in Aristotle, Agamben, Walcott, Hughes, and Coetzee Evy Varsamopoulou , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: ISLE : Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment , Spring vol. 21 no. 2 2014; (p. 315-336)
'The aim of this paper will be to explore the insidious moves by which human discourse transforms the nonhuman world from an existing alterity to a dead object. The objective will then be to trace paths by which we can potentially make space again for the oikos/eco, the home, to exist. As such, it is an objective that can be identified with a multiplicity of discursive formations—literature, philosophy, anthropology—all of which are threads that intertwine in an orientation that must needs also be political since it is openly conducted with an ecocritical stance (though not a predetermined agenda). The ecocritical methodology I adopt is ultimately premised on the comparative principle of combination or contamination of discourses and against their separation into strict, “pure” forms. In the same vein, this reflects the understanding of the world implied by Tim Ingold's term “meshwork,” as a more accurate description of the “entangled lines of life, growth, movement” (Ingold 63), rather than the commonly used term “network,” which would imply discrete, “interacting entities” (Ingold 63). These paths to be then traced are really a form of relation to the earth as world expressed in poetic and philosophical language; such a relationality is first and foremost a way of imagining and experiencing being that decenters the human while relying nonetheless on a human form of expression for its achievement...' (Publication summary)
“Animal Tracks in the Margin”: Tracing the Absent Referent in Marian Engel’s Bear and J.M. Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals Paul Barrett , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , vol. 45 no. 3 2014;

'This paper considers Carol Adams' notion of the absent referent in Engel's Bear and Coetzee's The Lives of Animals. I argue that both texts call for altered notions of reading and criticism that attempt to write the evasive presence of animals within textuality. Engel and Coetzee use different techniques to at once point to the impossibility of textual presence, in Adams' sense, while also stressing the necessity of striving for a form of presence that represents animals beyond the logic of the absent referent.' (Publication abstract)

Mirror Neurons and Literature : Empathy and the Sympathetic Imagination in the Fiction of J.M. Coetzee 2014 single work
— Appears in: MediaTropes , vol. 4 no. 2 2014; (p. 98-113)
'In the two essays “The Philosophers and the Animals” and “The Poets and the Animals” (in The Lives of Animals, 1999) J.M. Coetzee lets Elizabeth Costello urge us to use our sympathetic imagination in order to access the experience of others—in particular, animals—and engage with them empathetically. Coetzee’s fiction illustrates how the use of the sympathetic imagination might evoke empathy in the reader. Narrative structure and the character’s mode of introspection engage the reader’s empathy through an ambivalent process of distancing and approximation, as Fritz Breithaupt puts forward in his narrative theory of empathy (Kulturen der Empathie, 2009). The sympathetic imagination and the complementary notion of embodiment feature prominently in Coetzee’s fictional discourse and resonate with neuroscience’s research on mirror neurons and their relation to empathy.' (Publication abstract)
What Does It Mean to Teach The Lives of Animals or Disgrace? Michael Bell , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 43-48)
Pedagogies of Discomfort : Teaching Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals Wendy Woodward , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 139-145)
Teaching Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals in the First-Year Composition Classroom Sharon Payne , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 174-179)
To Live : Exploring the Meshwork of Being in Aristotle, Agamben, Walcott, Hughes, and Coetzee Evy Varsamopoulou , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: ISLE : Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment , Spring vol. 21 no. 2 2014; (p. 315-336)
'The aim of this paper will be to explore the insidious moves by which human discourse transforms the nonhuman world from an existing alterity to a dead object. The objective will then be to trace paths by which we can potentially make space again for the oikos/eco, the home, to exist. As such, it is an objective that can be identified with a multiplicity of discursive formations—literature, philosophy, anthropology—all of which are threads that intertwine in an orientation that must needs also be political since it is openly conducted with an ecocritical stance (though not a predetermined agenda). The ecocritical methodology I adopt is ultimately premised on the comparative principle of combination or contamination of discourses and against their separation into strict, “pure” forms. In the same vein, this reflects the understanding of the world implied by Tim Ingold's term “meshwork,” as a more accurate description of the “entangled lines of life, growth, movement” (Ingold 63), rather than the commonly used term “network,” which would imply discrete, “interacting entities” (Ingold 63). These paths to be then traced are really a form of relation to the earth as world expressed in poetic and philosophical language; such a relationality is first and foremost a way of imagining and experiencing being that decenters the human while relying nonetheless on a human form of expression for its achievement...' (Publication summary)
“Animal Tracks in the Margin”: Tracing the Absent Referent in Marian Engel’s Bear and J.M. Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals Paul Barrett , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , vol. 45 no. 3 2014;

'This paper considers Carol Adams' notion of the absent referent in Engel's Bear and Coetzee's The Lives of Animals. I argue that both texts call for altered notions of reading and criticism that attempt to write the evasive presence of animals within textuality. Engel and Coetzee use different techniques to at once point to the impossibility of textual presence, in Adams' sense, while also stressing the necessity of striving for a form of presence that represents animals beyond the logic of the absent referent.' (Publication abstract)

y Sympathy for the Animal(ized) Other in Selected Works of J. M. Coetzee On Yue Joyce Chan , Hong Kong : 2015 8424922 2015 single work thesis

'Sympathy, understood to be the capacity to suffer with the other, has long been regarded as one of the major vehicles to inspire an ethical communion. By minimizing differences through identification, sympathy helps us resonate with other beings and to exist in relation to them. This thesis examines the ethical endeavors on the vexed question of sympathy in four works by J. M. Coetzee - - The Lives of Animals (1999), Disgrace (1999), Elizabeth Costello (2003) and Slow Man (2005), all of which manifest Coetzee's notable interest in a fully-engaged sympathetic imagination into depraved and deprived human or nonhuman subjects. ' (Thesis summary)

Mirror Neurons and Literature : Empathy and the Sympathetic Imagination in the Fiction of J.M. Coetzee 2014 single work
— Appears in: MediaTropes , vol. 4 no. 2 2014; (p. 98-113)
'In the two essays “The Philosophers and the Animals” and “The Poets and the Animals” (in The Lives of Animals, 1999) J.M. Coetzee lets Elizabeth Costello urge us to use our sympathetic imagination in order to access the experience of others—in particular, animals—and engage with them empathetically. Coetzee’s fiction illustrates how the use of the sympathetic imagination might evoke empathy in the reader. Narrative structure and the character’s mode of introspection engage the reader’s empathy through an ambivalent process of distancing and approximation, as Fritz Breithaupt puts forward in his narrative theory of empathy (Kulturen der Empathie, 2009). The sympathetic imagination and the complementary notion of embodiment feature prominently in Coetzee’s fictional discourse and resonate with neuroscience’s research on mirror neurons and their relation to empathy.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 2 Dec 2014 10:13:03
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