'Cheeky' single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2013 2013
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Nicholas Jose considers 'the language of Australian literature as being distinct from other Englishes in its relationship with Aboriginal English, a language that is used creatively in Aboriginal literature. Aboriginal English and Aboriginal literature have, in turn, their separate relationships with Aboriginal languages, many of which are lost, and with Indigenous knowledges, which they continue and communicate. Those other Aboriginal languages, known and unknown, shadow Australian literature in English and set it apart. To this extent, I will argue, Australian literature speaks a language that resists ready assimilation to Anglophone and world literary constructions' [p. 189].

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Scenes of Reading : Is Australian Literature a World Literature? Robert Dixon (editor), Brigid Rooney (editor), North Melbourne : Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2013 6581736 2013 anthology criticism

    'Australian literature is negotiating the relationship between its legacy as a national literature and its growing international reach. Scenes of Reading explores some of the key questions and issues arising from this moment of apparent transformation. How is Australian literature connected to other literatures? What potential might transnational reading practices have to renew the practice of Australian literary criticism? And as such criticism challenges the provincialising of knowledge, to what extent might perspectives routed through the literary province in turn challenge 'world' literature?' (Publisher's blurb)

    North Melbourne : Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2013
    pg. 189-196
Last amended 29 Jan 2014 13:21:48
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