Issue Details: First known date: 2014 2014
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Literatures in English : New Ethical, Cultural and Transnational Perspectives Wolfgang Zach (editor), Rona Richman Kenneally (editor), Michael Kenneally (editor), Tubingen : Stauffenburg Verlag , 2014 6921601 2014 anthology criticism

    'The thirty papers in this volume are the product of a Conference of the Centre for the International Study of Literatures in English at Innsbruck University hosted by the School of Irish Studies at Concordia University Montreal. They examine how Literatures in English are increasingly influenced by globalization and hybridity stemming from national and international cross-cultural encounters. Particular attention is paid to the thematic aesthetics emanating from the changes in national identities and value systems as a result of increasing multicultural and minority voices within nation states, the growing cultural and linguistic networks of transnational interrelations, and more overt literary exploration of subjects such as law, religion and racism. These concerns by writers in English may result from actual migrations and border crossings but may also stem from imaginative processes which envision identities that transcend or eschew concrete manifestations of socially or nationally constructed selves.' (Publisher's blurb)

    Tubingen : Stauffenburg Verlag , 2014

Works about this Work

Nation, Identity, and Subjectivity in Globalizing Literature Yasue Arimitsu , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 13 2014; (p. 1-12)

'Since the end of the 20th century, particularly after the Cold War ended, national borderlines have been redrawn many times in the areas of the Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and a wide range of Asia, and people started crossing national borderlines to immigrate to other countries. As a result, the definition of a modern nation with one ethnicity, one language, and one culture collapsed. Under the policy of multiculturalism, Australia accepts immigrants from all over the world, and Australian literature at present is characterized as being ethnically, culturally, and linguistically hybrid. In this paper I look at Australian writers such as Brian Castro and Nam Le and compare them with other writers who are considered post-colonial writers, such as Salman Rushdie, V.S. Naipaul and Kazuo Ishiguro. I focus on how these writers attempt to present their identities along with their subjectivities. I also compare them with a Japanese writer, Haruki Murakami, whose literary works are widely read throughout the world, crossing cultural, ethnic, and language barriers, even though he writes in Japanese and has a mono-cultural background. I investigate the reason why Murakami’s works are accepted by many contemporary readers worldwide. I finally explore the meaning of national identity and subjectivity in the globalizing world, and clarify the transformation of modern literature.' (Author's abstract)

Nation, Identity, and Subjectivity in Globalizing Literature Yasue Arimitsu , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 13 2014; (p. 1-12)

'Since the end of the 20th century, particularly after the Cold War ended, national borderlines have been redrawn many times in the areas of the Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and a wide range of Asia, and people started crossing national borderlines to immigrate to other countries. As a result, the definition of a modern nation with one ethnicity, one language, and one culture collapsed. Under the policy of multiculturalism, Australia accepts immigrants from all over the world, and Australian literature at present is characterized as being ethnically, culturally, and linguistically hybrid. In this paper I look at Australian writers such as Brian Castro and Nam Le and compare them with other writers who are considered post-colonial writers, such as Salman Rushdie, V.S. Naipaul and Kazuo Ishiguro. I focus on how these writers attempt to present their identities along with their subjectivities. I also compare them with a Japanese writer, Haruki Murakami, whose literary works are widely read throughout the world, crossing cultural, ethnic, and language barriers, even though he writes in Japanese and has a mono-cultural background. I investigate the reason why Murakami’s works are accepted by many contemporary readers worldwide. I finally explore the meaning of national identity and subjectivity in the globalizing world, and clarify the transformation of modern literature.' (Author's abstract)

Last amended 16 Jan 2014 11:50:31
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