form y R v. Floyd single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2012 2012
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • c
      Australia,
      c
      :
      ABC Television , 2012 .
      Extent: 60 min.p.
      Series: form y Rake Richard Roxburgh , Charles Waterstreet , Peter Duncan , Peter Duncan , Andrew Knight , Australia : ABC Television , 2010-2016 Z1737627 2010 series - publisher film/TV crime

      'On any single day, Cleaver Greene is described as many things. Whilst his ex-wife may call him 'unreliable", his son will call him "a mate". To his learned friends at the bar table he is "a real wag", to his jurors he is "hilarious", and to most judges he is "an outrage". To the Tax Office, he is "a defendant", to a certain brothel owner "a legend", and to his former cocaine dealer "a tragic loss".

      'The clients he loves the most - the cases that thrill him - are those that appear to be utterly hopeless. There's something about being on the wrong side of conventional wisdom that feels right to him, be it at the bar table or the dinner table.

      'He will do whatever it takes to defend and save life's truly lost souls. The big sinners. Its drug lords. Its cannibals. Its bestialites. And at the same time, he will struggle to save himself, to stop himself falling back into the abyss that has characterised most of his self-destructive adult life thus far.

      'Despite his own hopelessness, his wit and charm have won him hordes of companions over the years. Most nights of the week, there is no shortage of invitations: dinner with a judge at the RMC (His Honour pays), or with some drug dealers in Chinatown (Manos pays), or with some of his copper mates at the Matador (no one pays).

      'Any gaps in his diary will inevitably be filled by either all night sessions in chambers preparing for court or similarly lengthy sessions at his favourite brothel, simply referred to by those in the know as "the Club" (here, Cleaver is more than happy to open his own wallet). He tends to wake up bruised. Physically. Emotionally. Spiritually. Usually it's a combination thereof. He spends a nano-second wondering how his life came to this - living in a studio above a café in the Cross, without his wife and son, in love with a prostitute, defending hopeless cases. Then he gets up, puts on his dressing gown and a pair of brogues and goes downstairs for a coffee. Then it's out into the world - onto the battleground that is Cleaver Greene's day.'

      Source: ABC Television website, http://www.abc.net.au/tv/
      Sighted: 1 November 2010.

      Number in series: 2.4

Awards

2013 winner AWGIE Awards Television: Series
Last amended 5 Oct 2013 10:46:04
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