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Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y Dwoort Baal Kaat single work   picture book   children's  
Alternative title: Dwoort Baal Kaat an Old Story Retold
Note: An old story retold by Kim Scott, Russell Nelly and the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project
Issue Details: First known date: 2013 2013
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A man goes hunting for some tucker with a pack of dogs, but he doesn’t get what he expected. Dwoort Baal Kaat is the story of how two different animals are related to one another.

'This story comes from the wise and ancient language of the First People of the Western Australian south coast, the Noongar people. Inspired by a story George Nelly and Bob Roberts told the linguist Gerhardt Laves at Albany, Western Australia, around 1931, it has been workshopped in a series of community meetings that included some of the contemporary family of both those men, as a part of the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project to revitalise an endangered language.' (Source: UWAP website : uwa.edu.au)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Note: Text in Noongar and English languages

Works about this Work

Finding a Place in Story : Kim Scott’s Writing and the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project Natalie Quinlivann , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;

'In True Country, the narrator draws the reader close and says, “You listen to me. We’re gunna make a story, true story. You might find it’s here you belong. A place like this.” (15) Although the narrator speaks of ‘(a) place like this’ as “a beautiful place (…). Call it our country, our country all ‘round here” (15), belonging, for the reader, for the characters in each of Scott’s novels, and for Scott himself, is more than settling into a physical environment, belonging is finding a place in the story.

'Mamang, Noongar Mambara Bakitj, Dwoort Baal Kaat, and Yira Boornak Nyininy are major achievements in Scott and The Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project’s process of returning, restoring and rejuvenating language and story within the Noongar community and for an ever-widening public. In their form, content and intent, the stories renegotiate ideas of place and placement, confronting personal, cultural and linguistic dislocations in Noongar lives as well as an ambivalent narrative landscape in which language and story are central to both a lingering colonialism and the process of decolonisation.' (Publication abstract)

Review : Dwoort Baal Kaat and Yira Boornak Nyininy Jo Burnell , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Good Reading , March 2014; (p. 68)

— Review of Yira Boornak Nyininy Kim Scott Hazel Brown Roma Winmar 2013 single work picture book ; Dwoort Baal Kaat Kim Scott Russell Nelly 2013 single work picture book
The Voices of This Land : Australian Picture Books Christine Nicholls , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 367 2014; (p. 66)

— Review of Yirruwa Yirrilikenuma-langwa : When We Go Walkabout Rhoda Dugururru Lalara 2014 single work picture book ; Our Island Alison Lester 2014 single work picture book ; Yira Boornak Nyininy Kim Scott Hazel Brown Roma Winmar 2013 single work picture book ; Dwoort Baal Kaat Kim Scott Russell Nelly 2013 single work picture book ; Karana : The Story of the Father Emu Joe Kirk 2014 single work picture book ; The Lost Girl Ambelin Kwaymullina 2014 single work children's fiction
Dwoort Baal Kaat an Old Story Retold [Book Review] Denise Angelo , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , December vol. 38 no. 2014; (p. 205-208)

— Review of Dwoort Baal Kaat Kim Scott Russell Nelly 2013 single work picture book
Review : Dwoort Baal Kaat and Yira Boornak Nyininy Jo Burnell , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Good Reading , March 2014; (p. 68)

— Review of Yira Boornak Nyininy Kim Scott Hazel Brown Roma Winmar 2013 single work picture book ; Dwoort Baal Kaat Kim Scott Russell Nelly 2013 single work picture book
The Voices of This Land : Australian Picture Books Christine Nicholls , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 367 2014; (p. 66)

— Review of Yirruwa Yirrilikenuma-langwa : When We Go Walkabout Rhoda Dugururru Lalara 2014 single work picture book ; Our Island Alison Lester 2014 single work picture book ; Yira Boornak Nyininy Kim Scott Hazel Brown Roma Winmar 2013 single work picture book ; Dwoort Baal Kaat Kim Scott Russell Nelly 2013 single work picture book ; Karana : The Story of the Father Emu Joe Kirk 2014 single work picture book ; The Lost Girl Ambelin Kwaymullina 2014 single work children's fiction
Dwoort Baal Kaat an Old Story Retold [Book Review] Denise Angelo , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , December vol. 38 no. 2014; (p. 205-208)

— Review of Dwoort Baal Kaat Kim Scott Russell Nelly 2013 single work picture book
Finding a Place in Story : Kim Scott’s Writing and the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project Natalie Quinlivann , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;

'In True Country, the narrator draws the reader close and says, “You listen to me. We’re gunna make a story, true story. You might find it’s here you belong. A place like this.” (15) Although the narrator speaks of ‘(a) place like this’ as “a beautiful place (…). Call it our country, our country all ‘round here” (15), belonging, for the reader, for the characters in each of Scott’s novels, and for Scott himself, is more than settling into a physical environment, belonging is finding a place in the story.

'Mamang, Noongar Mambara Bakitj, Dwoort Baal Kaat, and Yira Boornak Nyininy are major achievements in Scott and The Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project’s process of returning, restoring and rejuvenating language and story within the Noongar community and for an ever-widening public. In their form, content and intent, the stories renegotiate ideas of place and placement, confronting personal, cultural and linguistic dislocations in Noongar lives as well as an ambivalent narrative landscape in which language and story are central to both a lingering colonialism and the process of decolonisation.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 30 Nov 2015 14:46:46
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