2251142614846715586.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Letter to Pessoa selected work   short story  
Letter to Pessoa Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Letter to Pessoa is the first collection of short stories by award-winning Goan-Australian poet Michelle Cahill. It is an imaginative tour de force, portraying the experiences of a whole range of characters, including a scientist, a cat and a young Indian female version of Joseph Conrad, in settings across the world, from Barcelona to Capetown, Boston to Chiang Mai, Kathmandu to Kraków. Like the poet Fernando Pessoa, who gives the collection its title, and who created as many as seventy versions of himself, Cahill displays a remarkable inventiveness, making distant landscapes and situations come alive, in compelling detail, as they express the fear and longing, obsession and outrage, of the people caught up in them.

'Displaying its awareness of the power of writing to create realities, the collection also includes a number of fictions in letter form, to Jacques Derrida, Virginia Woolf, Jean Genet and Margaret Atwood – and to JM Coetzee, from his character Melanie Isaacs. ' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Epigraph: 'I feel as if I'm always on the verge of waking up,' -Fernando Pessoa, The Book of Disquiet

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Artarmon, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Giramondo Publishing , 2016 .
      2251142614846715586.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 247p.
      Note/s:
      • Published September 2016
      ISBN: 9781925336146

Works about this Work

Tightrope Fiona Hile , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 387 2016; (p. 31)
'You can tell a lot about a piece of writing from how it begins. For American poet Billy Collins, ‘the first line is the DNA of the poem’. With novels, as J.M. Coetzee writes, in Elizabeth Costello, ‘the problem of the opening ... is a simple bridging problem ... People solve such problems every day ... and having solved them push on.’ Coetzee’s high-wire opening barely hints at the philosophico-literary grapplings that will ensue, but in an after-the-fact reading it is all there – the structural reliance on Kafka’s ‘Before the Law’ (1915), the inference that a passage through the recurring impasses of language is somehow guaranteed by death, the acknowledgment that building/writing is also always a matter of destruction.' (Introduction)
Letter to Pessoa Review : Michelle Cahill's Stories with the Literary Big Hitters Cameron Woodhead , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 28 October 2016;

— Review of Letter to Pessoa Michelle Cahill 2016 selected work short story
A Feast of Bite-Sized Gems Elaine Fry , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 19 October 2016; (p. 18)
Letters to Who? On Michelle Cahill Paul Sharrad , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , September 2016;

— Review of Letter to Pessoa Michelle Cahill 2016 selected work short story
Letters to Who? On Michelle Cahill Paul Sharrad , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , September 2016;

— Review of Letter to Pessoa Michelle Cahill 2016 selected work short story
Letter to Pessoa Review : Michelle Cahill's Stories with the Literary Big Hitters Cameron Woodhead , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 28 October 2016;

— Review of Letter to Pessoa Michelle Cahill 2016 selected work short story
A Feast of Bite-Sized Gems Elaine Fry , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 19 October 2016; (p. 18)
Tightrope Fiona Hile , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 387 2016; (p. 31)
'You can tell a lot about a piece of writing from how it begins. For American poet Billy Collins, ‘the first line is the DNA of the poem’. With novels, as J.M. Coetzee writes, in Elizabeth Costello, ‘the problem of the opening ... is a simple bridging problem ... People solve such problems every day ... and having solved them push on.’ Coetzee’s high-wire opening barely hints at the philosophico-literary grapplings that will ensue, but in an after-the-fact reading it is all there – the structural reliance on Kafka’s ‘Before the Law’ (1915), the inference that a passage through the recurring impasses of language is somehow guaranteed by death, the acknowledgment that building/writing is also always a matter of destruction.' (Introduction)
Last amended 21 Feb 2017 11:22:12
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